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Full text of "The Tower, 1932"

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■•UKIilSHEII ISI 1HE 

MINIM! MAS* 

INSTITUTE 

MUNOMONIE 



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XN selecting the art 
theme for this 
book, we chose 
the motto of our col- 
lege, the words which 
express our own ideals, 
if we are faithful to 
our parents' trusts 
"Learning, Industry, 
Skill and Honor.' 9 




I 




\ 



\ 



I. 


The College 


II. 


Learning 




Classes 


III. 


Industry 




Organiza tions 


IV. 


Skill 




Athletics 


V. 


Honor 




Feature 








edlncaflffiOTV 



XN appreciation 
of their love, 
their trust, their 
sacrifices, which have 
made possible our 
years in college, to our 
parents we reverently 
dedicate this, the 1932 
Tower. 



/ 




< 





On the banks of Lake 
Menomin, 

Stands our Alma 
Mater true, 

With tower high and 
brilliant "S"; 

For her we'll dare and 
do. 

We'll sing her praises 

many, 

We'll glorify her name, 

And on throughout the 
years of time, 

Our love for Stout pro- 
claim. 




Opportunity 

□ 

There is a tide in the 
affairs of men, 

Which taken at the 
flood, leads on to 
fortune; 

Omitted, all the voyage 
of their life 

Is bound in shallows 
and in miseries. 

On such a full sea are 
we now afloat; 

And we must take the 
current when it 
serves, 

Or lose our ventures. 

William Shakespeare 













Very old art t/h u oods; 

And the buds that break 
Out of the briar's boughs, 

When March winds wake, 
So old with their beaut) are — 

()/), HO >"an km ni s 

Through u hat u lid centuries 

R<>t es back the rose. 

Very old are the brooks} 

And the rills that rise 
When snow sleeps cold beneath 

The azure skies 
Sing such a history 

( )l • mne and 
Their every drop /n dv u ISl 
As Solomon. 



— Walter /), la Ware 



' 



Come v " the north wlnd'i masonry. 
Out of an unseen quarry <•-• > 
Furnished with tile, the fierce artificer 

Curio bis white bastions with projected 

roof 

Round every windward stake, or tree, or 
door. 

Speeding, the myriad-handed, his wild work 

So fanciful, so sal/age, nought cares be 

lor number or proportion. 

And when bis hours are numbered, and the 

world 
Is all his own, retiring, as be were not, 
Leaves, when the sun appears, astonished Art 

To mimic in tlou structures, stone b) stone. 
Built in an age, the mad wind's night-WOtk, 

The frolic architecture of the snou. 

— Ralph Waldo '-.met son 








Afi ;;////;/ /<•/< go a thousand ti 

and dcath<. of kings, 
And yet recalls the very hour — 
'Twas noon by yonder village i 
And on the la-^t blue noon in May — 
The wind came briskly nf> this way, 
Crisping the brook road; 

Then. /></■ dou n it< load 

Of pine-seen!-., and shook Usti 

Two petals from tin wild-n 

— Thomas Bailey Aid rich 



■ 



w. v 



*'• k k . 



Little park that I pass through, 
I carry <,ff a piece of you 

morning hurrying down 
!<■• my it ork-day in the ton n; 
I take your trees. 
And your 
Y<mr greenness, 
Your cleanness, 

Some of your shade, some of you 
Some of your calm as I go by; 
Your flowers to trim 
I In ■ pavement s g ri m ; 

Your space for room in the jostled ttreei 
And grass for carpet to my 

— Helen I lay/ 





I cannot always feel 
his kindness. 

Sometimes he walks 
beside me, step by 
step, 

And paces slowly in the 

ways — 

T h e s i in pie wingless 

ways 

T h a t in y t h o u g h t 

tread. He gossips 
with me then, 

And finds it good; 

Not as an eagle might, 
his wings folded, be 
content 

To walk a little, know- 
ing it his choice. 

But as a simple man, 

My friend. 

Adapted from 

EUNICE Tl OMENS 






The faculty, 

to us, the freshmen, 

were strangers; 

but four years, 

commencement; 

the faculty, 

to ns, the seniors, 

are friends. 



AllfiiHKTIPiJittt 



0>s^BIIWBK/7J2 




Burtox E \i lson, President 
To the Anniversary Class 

"^^^•MIl ( lass of 1952 has several anniversaries associated with this year to make 
# CA the class unique. This is an interesting year in many respects. The thing 

V^ J tliu is uppermost in the minds of all students is the fact that this is the bi- 
^™^ Centennial anniversary of the birth of Washington. It is an important even: 
in national and world history. It should be significant to the class of 

But that is not all that makes the year memorable. It has special bearing upon The 
Stout Institute and upon the educational history of Wisconsin. 

This year vocational education becomes of age in Wisconsin. Twenty-one years 
.;is summer the legislature passed the law creating the vocational schools of the 
Twenty-one years ago The Stout Institute became a State school and was charged 
with the training of home economics and industrial education teachers for the 
Twenty-one years ago the first compulsory part-time vocational school in any state was 
Organized and operated in Wisconsin. Twenty-one years ago the first din 
tional education in America wis appointed and began a study of his problem. With us 
it should be a year of celebration almost as significant as the other celebration that com- 
memorates the birth of the man who made this nation possible. 

The time is near when we may begin the writing of the history of this great edu- 
cational movement in the state and nation; and when it is written The Stout Institute 
must shine as a beacon light showing the way to newer and better things in the educa- 
tion of the Youth of America. 

The Class of 1952 is fortunate in the possession of these interesting educational 
landmarks. 

Burton E. Nklson, Pro. 







T^BIIWBR/yjS 










College curricula in home economics today 
are concerned with a study of the philosophies 
and activities which will help individuals live 

in the social environment of their home 
and community groups. The curriculum of 
the School of Home Economics at The Stout 
Institute consists of work in the academic, pro- 
fessional and home economics fields. Academ- 
ic courses give satisfactory background for the 

interpretation of the events of today's living 
situations. Professional courses offer oppor- 
tunities for preparation in those fields of work 
which are educational in nature, and which vo- 
cationally are related to the activities of the 
home. The home economics courses empha- 
size the social values of some technical skills. 
I>:\ Dewey's statement that all aspects of edu- 
cation are primarily social is the basic thought 
underlying the above curriculum. We feel 
that the organization of this curriculum with 
the opportunities for extra-curricular contacts 
at The Stout Institute offers a satisfying col- 
lege career for the young woman, and it also 
offers an opportunity to participate in profes- 
sional or vocational lines of work, and a background for advanced study. The young 
women completing this course should go out as socially responsible persons in any com- 
munity. 

Ri in E. Mn 

The School of Industrial Education at The Stout Institute offers a curriculum with 
a range and proportioning of opportunities to give the individual a modern college de- 
ment. In addition to this, the required courses, plus the properly grouped selection' 

in elecdves, give the graduates a preparation 
to meet the growing responsibilities ,md re- 
quirements of the teaching positions, of the li- 
censing divisions of state departments of edu- 
cation and of the graduate school entrance re- 
quirements. A tine range of appropriate extra- 
curricular organizations supplement the cur- 
ricular activities, and contribute to the well 
balanced social and professional progress of the 
students. The graduate is prepared for mod- 
ern educational responsibility. His development 
in The Stout Institute prepares him to teach 
young people and adults, meeting their need* 
in modern changing conditions. It also pre- 
pares him for advantageous entry in modern 
industrial situations, if he so chooses. His 
work in science, mathema: .. .! science, 

English, education, physical education, and 
technical courses is designed in range, depth, 
and proportioning to prepare him for advan- 
CagCOUS entry and participation in the broad 
range of activities in our pix 
tion. 

Clyde A. Bow m w 






CLYDE A. BOWMAN 











OW£TW9nBWL/<7J2 




Alice Houston Mary Louisi Buchanan Gertrude L. Callahan 

Nursery School l oods English 



Leth w. Walsh 
Home Economics Education 



MlLDREN L. LAVTON 

Home Administration 



Hazei Van Ni ss 



\! M \ M. G w/ 
Home Economics Education 




Thomas \\". JOHiS 
\Elcmeiitar^ and G 
Woodu or/; 

J. E, Ray 

An /./tec /lira! Drau />/,;;. 
Drafting, Freehand Draw- 
I icklaying, Concrete 
Work 






H. M. Hanson 
Advanced Woodu ork 



Ray F. Kran/ 
.\«/o Mechanics, Home 
Mechanu i 



. 



r ^fKHWER/<7J2 




Roland P. Gray 

English 



B. M. 1 
Business Manager 



Mi ki i M. Prk i 
History, Dean of Men 



( 1 \K\ YOHR 

Stenographer 



Mabi i H. Lei dom 
mistry 



M VKl! I 1 [OPKINS 

Experimental C 



Kathi rn McKinnen 

rn Si /"»<'' 



C. L Run 

Mat he iu at;. . - 



R. L. Welch 
Vocational Industrial Educa- 




! D\\ ARD < :. PlJXKE 



Arthur G. Brov n 



■ 



ov>» 



4^*^ 



O^BHWHK/^JS 




Acnes Winston Mar< vrei Winnona Cruisi Lillian | 

tant to Registrar Nutrition {elated Art 



1 I OYD Kiiih 

General Metals, S \f <•/</.' 






F. E. TUSTISON 

Math Science, Home 

mid 
Danii i Gri in i l. I . (, 

Drafting trial 

Work, Science 





I. ii i ian M. Froccai i 
Librai ) . id ministration 



\\\U\ I. M< I M'Dl N 

.it ion 



"•!. l'kic i 

fional Home Economics 

at ion 







O'Brien 

trar 






r >7-/ 1 fHIWER/<7J2 




Helen B. Staverlok Ki i/abi th Hvenson 
j! Office Clerk College Nui 



M. Ba< ii\i \n\ 
Biolosh 



Waltfr B. Davison 

s s 



Fred L. Clrran 
Industrial Ed in a/ion 



H. C. Mi: n.s 
Shop Practice, Voun- 

Work, Pattern Making 



I'm i ( \i 

n ork, Car- 



Marv M. 

CkeiH 



Gra< i \1. Do* 

Director of 1 1 all', and //'.//>- 

M.wi: Mi rn \ M. Mn i i k 

Related Art 










>7^KIIWKK /<7J2 




BERNI< i Ri i MOl DS 

Physical Education for 
Women 



All: I M. BURGOIN 

Cafeteria Managt meni 



Vioi ! i M. 1 Iassi.i k 
Public Speaking, English 



(i \u \ Louisi Bough row 

Home Economics Education 



Lillian Carson 

Related Art 



Mvrti i Sir \ni> 

Assistant Librarian 



C. W. H 
Printing 



Robert Bruci Antrim 
Assistant librarian 







Eari I.. Blrbriix.i 
Physical Education, Coaching 






John l \\\\ le, Jr. 
Social Science 









Mui?*i*r. 



From compromise and 
things half done. 

Keep me, with stern and 
stubborn pride; 

And when, at last, the fight 
is won, 

Ciod keep me still un- 
satisfied. 

I ntermeyer 



Senior Class 



Officers 

Harold Hycr . . President 

Claryssc Ness . Vice-President 

Laura Andreasscii . Secretary 

Itohert Keick . Treasurer 



flEKiftlES 




R.OB1 ki GUNN 

"Bob" 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

'resident, K. F. S.; Men's Glee 

Club; Men's Quartette: Treasurer. 

S. T. S.; President Senior Class 

Second Semester 

Clarssi Ness 

"c/. 

Hendricks, Minnesota 

President, Philomathean: W. A. A.; 

Lutheran Students; Home E© 

ics Club; Nice-President, Senior 

Class; Home Economics Senate 

\ AnDR] \ssi \ 

ura" 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A.; 

RT Rl K K 

"Bob" 

Ashland, W is< 
Industrial Education Eorum; Arts 
and C raits; S. T. S. 



♦ 



Mvrii i A. AND1 
"Myrl" 

Colt'.ix. Wisconsin 
S. M. A. : M. A. P.; Women's Glee 

Club, President 

A i i ri i) Bam R 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



Waupun. Wisconsin 
S. T. S.; Stoutonia; Secretary, In- 
dustrial Education Forum 

Ml IAIN Bl Til ri 1 v 

"Mel" 

ElmWoid. Wisconsin 
Band; Orchestra 




:;<■! BiwiR 

"Rntih" 

Wauvni. Wisconsin 
Treasurer, Industrial Education 

Forum; Men's Glee Club; K. 1 . Y: 
"S" Club 



John BuTENHOFf 
"Boots' 1 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 
President, Metallurgy Club; 

Stoutonia 



\ lAYDl N Bow i RS 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 



Bl RNIK 1 BrIC k! R 

"B< 

Park I alls, Wisconsin 
Areme; Women's Glee Club 





t- 



Mary Ei aim ( a\ : 

Warroad. Minnesota 

Areme; Y. W. C A.: Home 
Economics Club 

i Cairi i u 
"Prof" 

Wakefield, Mid 

President, Band 

Dorothy Cole 
"Dot" 

Goodman. Wisconsin 

Philomathean; Home Economics 
Club 

Marion Cress 
"Mare" 

Ellsworth, Minnesota 

M. A. P.; Hyperian; W. A. A.; 

Marquette-LaSalle: Home Econom- 
ics Club 




Gf.rai.mnf Andi WON 

n" 
W'hcelcr, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Senate; Mai 
quette-LaSallc 



Ethi i Andi won 

"/<,./•• 

(rosin . Minnesota 
Treasurer, S. M. A.; Home Econ- 
omics Club; Home Economics 
Sen ICC 



\ i r.i ki Andi rson 
"Squcek 

Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

i . O. Ii. 



Ai \ \ Adi s 

■wr 

Wautoma, Wisconsin 

President. Areme; Band; Home 

Economics Club 



$ 



Si \\i i 1 RaDDATZ 

"Tannty" 
Madison, Wisconsin 



EDM ARI> RaOKI 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 



I [ARM Hanoi < ki R 

Stoughcon, Wisconsin 
Track. 1931 



1 [aROI I) Randi t KI K 

Stouijluon. Wisconsin 

Arts and I Track 




Su vi ( V] 

"S/ikr 

Ironwood. Michigan 

President. I. O. B.; Marquette- 
LaSallc; "S" Club 

I . Will MU> To>* M 

"Fred" 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 
Glee Club; Metallurgy 



1 ! Ml K Sll\l>I 

"Elm" 

Mcnomonic. Wisconsin 

S. T. S.; Lutheran Students 

(il KA1 I) Tk\!>i K 

"Jerry" 

Chippewa Falls. \\ isconsin 
Band; Orchestra 




§ 




A. Douglas Johnson 
"Doug" 

Carrington, North Dakota 

Fred Johnson 
"Fritz" 

B-.w.ibik, Minnesota 
"S" I lub; Bask 



Henry Kang is 
"Hicky" 

Biwabik, Minn 

"S" Club: I . O. B. 

Gl RTRUDI Kl I 

"Gertie" 

Hibbirv.;. Minn 

Secretary. S. M. A.: Vice-President, 
M. A. I'.; Whs Editor, S:outonia 




1 I I/A1J1 Ml C I KKAN 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 

Secretary, Senior Class; S. M. A.; 
Home Economics Club 



1 1 I 1 I RSON CRONK 

■'Jeff" 

Menomonic. Wisconsin 

Metallurgy; Football; "S" Club 



Ray Dondi in 

"Ray" 

Port Washington. Wisconsin 
Marqucttc-LaSallc; "S" Club 



Fred Doetzi 

"Hot S/u,/" 

White water. Wisconsin 
S. T. S. 




RUDOI.PM I)l 1 NOW 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



(.1 Ni VII \ I DUTTON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Areme; Home Economics Club; 
v. w. c \ 



Don m i) I i i is 

"Don" 
I loulton, Maine 

Industrial Education Forum; 

and ('rat is 



Jam i Evans 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

W . A. A.J Y. W. C. A.; Women's 
(,lee Club; Rifle Club 




Gail Gallon u 
"Gail" 

Libcrtx villc. Illinois 

Vice-President. S. S. A.; S. M A.; 
Home Economics Senate 



(,II Bl R ISDN 

"Squirm" 

Bbck River Falls, Wisconsin 

Hyperian; (.Ice Club; Lutheran 

Students 



Stanley (hi i s>>x 
"Stan" 

Brodhc.id, Wisconsin 



Si i phi n Govin 
"Stcu" 

Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 









Chestlr Larson 

"Chct" 

Pewaukce, Wisconsin 
S. T. S. 

(,l K A I I> 1 A KM N 

n l«rf 

LaCrosse, Wisconsin 
Rifle Club 

Lorraim Litchfield 
"Rainy 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

President. I lonie Economics Club; 

Hyperian; Areme; Y. W. C. A. 

Cabinet; Women's Council 
Gl I i !>\ [GSON 

"1 ud" 

Elk Mound. Wisconsin 
K. I . S.; Arts and Crafts 




JOI HORKY 

ville, Wisconsin 

ik Hi SKO 

"Husky" 

Biwabik, Minn 

F. O. B. 



Harold Hyfr 
"Prexy" 

Stevens Point, Wisconsin 

Industrial Education Forum; Presi- 
dent. Senior Class. First Semester 

A 1 1 ki i) Ida 

■• \r 

Augusta. Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students 






Margari 
"Senty" 

Independence, Wisconsin 

Science Club; Home Economics 
Club 

[OHN Si a! ..ii 1 1 k 

"Tiny" 

Douglas. Arizona 

"S" Club; Student Athletics 
Manager 

EVER! 11 Sni I Mi 

"Smitty" 

Chetek. Wisconsin 

Metallurgy; Tumbling 

[Ol Si'iiv- 

,f Spitz" 

Gilbert. Minn, 

S. T. S.; Secretary-Treasurer, "S" 
Club; Marquette-LaSallc 




Marqi i i i i III v i n 

"Miiii/m//:" 

Ancigo, Wisconsin 
Hyperian 

Doris I li nry 
"Jo" 

Waukegan, Illinois 

s. \l. A.; M. A. P.; Home Econ- 
omics Club; Home Economics 
Senate 

(,l ORGl I II KKMI s 1 K 

"Hermy" 

Clayton, Wisconsin 

V. \l. C A.; Kind; Orchestra: 
Lutheran Students 

i;i i)i I in <.i N 

Ccdarburv;. Wisconsin 
M. A. P. 








Kamiikim GRASU1 

"K*to" 

Spring Valley, Wisconsin 
Philomathean; W. A. A. 



Dan W. (.km n 
"Dan" 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Orchestra; S. T. S.; Y. M. C. A. 
and Crafts 



Leon Haase 

WaUSau, Wisconsin 
"S" Club; F. O. B. 



Ervin Ha(,i \l ss 

"En/" 

Ossco, Wisconsin 
Band 




G. Raymond 

k" 

Altoona, Wisconsin 
F. O. B.; "S" Club 

Carl Roll 

Mawille, Wisconsin 

President. S. S. A.; I. O. B. 
M. A. P. 



\< I RVA.N 

Redore. Minn 
S. M. A. 

's St IIMIDT 

Dundee, Minnesota 

Ritle Club: Arcmc; Home Econom- 
ics Club; Home Economics Senate 



• 



I 01 [SI I ioBART 

'7 ui" 

Lake Crystal. Minnesota 

Philomathe.m: W. A. A. 

\\'i si i \ 1 [oci R 

Charles City, Iowa 
K. F. S. : "$" Club 



Carl Hoi rm mann 

"C^r/" 

Menomonie, W 
S. T. S. 

W'li i [AM I 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 
1 . O. H.: Tumbling 




A I U I Ovirim 

\!" 
Reads, Minnesota 

Philomathcan; W. A. A.; Home 
Economics Club 



I i w is PaI mi k 
"Lou" 

Mankato, Minnesota 
S Club; K. I. s. ; Forum 



i i i wok I'll RSON 
■lilh" 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A.; Home Economics Club 



Grayci- Quartirs 

Superior. Wisconsin 

Philomathean 






Mi run Wagner 
"Wag*' 

Minot, North Dakota 

V. M. C. A.; Stoutonia Staff 



M \K(.KI I I W Mil 

"Mugs" 

Menomonie. W Wisconsin 

\\" \l II R 1 . W IS 

"Walt" 

Bayfield, Wisconsin 
President. Rifle Club 

lix/.i Willi 

Woodman, Wisconsin 

President. Pegasus Club; S 
Club; Home Economics Club; 
Home Economics Senate 




Arvid Lundeen 

"! iiiiih," 

Wcstboro, Wis< 

I . O. B. 

I [aROI I) Ma i son 

Gilbert. Minnesota 
"S" Club; Football 



\\l J. Mil HEELS 
"Bud" 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

President. "S" Club; President, 
Fducationai Forum; F. O. B.: Band 

(ii ni vu vi \\< i Armstrong 

,n" 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



# 






:; Hansom 

-Hans- 
Taylor, Wisconsin 

Arts .\n<l ( drafts; Metallurgy 

M. C \. 

i \! MA' \ i ANSI N 

"l.iiniid" 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Hyperian; M. A. P.; 

\\ . \. \. 



h ssn I Iansi n 
"Jessie 

Geraldinc. Montana 

Hi NRY Harmon 
"Hank" 

Eau Galle. Wisconsin 

"S" Club; Football; Marquette- 
LaSalle; Treasurer. S. S. A.; F. O. B. 




Anthony Ki kar 
"Tony 

Gilbert, Minnesota 

"S" Club: Marquette-LaSalle; Band 

Marian Kk am k 

"Betty 

Gilbert. Minn, 

Home Economics Club; Y. W. C. 
A.j Marquette-LaSalle; Glee Club; 

Home Economics s 



[EN Nil LONGAR 

Evclcth. Minnesota 

Home Economics Club; Marquette- 
LaSalle 

\ I \\<.i NO! 

"Tony 

Swanton, Ohio 

Stout Rifle Club: Arts and < 
Marquette-LaSalle 



* 





W'll 1 [AM Ml KKAY 

"Bill" 
Eau Claire. Wisconsin 
President. S. T. S.; Marquette-La- 
Salle; Stoutonia; Manager, Intra- 

Mural Athletics; Tumblers 

Ellen Nelson 

Cryst.il Falls, Michigan 

lent. Science Club: Secret ary- 
rer, Pegasus Club; Y. \\". C. 
A.j Home Economics Club 

JOSl I'll Ni l Dl t Kl K 

"Joe" 

Albert Lea, Minnesota 

Vice-President, Marquct tc-LaSallc; 

iry-Tre.isurer, "S" Club; 
President. K. I . S. 

\\"\1 II k E. Oja 

"Wally 

nia, Minn 
Y. M. C A. 




Laurii I i ii ro 
Gilbert. Minnesota 

;ing Editor, Stoutonia, I irst 
Semester 



Mar icikii Cronk 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club 



s Kl IN Goi 1S( I I.M.I 

Boycrtown. Pennsylvania 

Y. m. G A. 



Mil OKI I) Haggard 
"Millif" 

W est A 1 1 is, Wisconsin 

President, W. A. A.; Secretary. 
M. A. P.; Philom.ube.rn 

Is I III K II \lsi 

"Esther" 

Brillion, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club 



Eari I [ai vorson 
"Blue" 

St. Paul. Minnesota 

Business Manager, Stoutonia; In- 
dus; rial Education Forum 

Ai in ki I [anson 

- w „ 

St. James. Minnesota 
M. A. P.; Glee Club 



6 




Eldrid Wiki 

Colfax, Wisconsin 

Hyperian; Areme; Home Econom- 
ics Club 



Mabel Jackson /immirman 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



Arthur Wd i 
"Willy" 

Jefferson, Wisconsin 

Industrial Education Forum; 
K. F. S. 



Ray P. ZlMMI RM \n\ 

-/jm" 

Oconto. Wisconsin 




© 




AON] S Vl Mil RG 
•th, Minnesota 
Y. \\ . C A.; Lutheran Students 

\< i Yi RBRII K 

"Flo 

Applcton, Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSallc: M. A. P.: Presi- 
dent, Hyperians 



Valeria 
"Val" 

Mencmcnie. Wisconsin 

*>. M. A.; Areme; I Ionic Economics 
Club: V. W. C A. 

Emily A. Vora< hi k 
"Emily Ann" 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

M. A. P. 



^ 



Wont be long Now/ 1 







Junior Class 

^~ -•- 

Officers 
William'Rowe . President 

Mary Jane Dorison, Vice-President 
Marion Hagman . Secretary 
Ernest Zick . . Treasurer 



IIIHi«IF* 




W'ii i i\m Row i 

-mil- 

1 lancock, Michigan 

Vice-President, Men's Glee Club; 

President, Junior Class; Stout 

Student Advisory Board 

Makv Jam DODSON 

"M. /." 

Siren, Wisconsin 

Vice-President, Hyperians; M. A. 

P.; Vice-President, Junior Class; 

Marquette- 1. aSallc 

Marian Hagman 

Kaukauna. Wisconsin 

Secretary, Hyperians; Home Econ- 
omics Club; Secretary, Junior Class 

ERN1 si Zl< k 

"Ernie" 

North St. Paul, Minnesota 
Metallurgy ; Treasurer, Junior Class 



$ 



•. m Aoes 
•7;- 

Wautoma, Wisconsin 

Band; Tower 

I vi i •« \ Amu RSON 

Hopkins. Minnesota 
w . \. \.; Areme 

lil HI AND1 RSON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Forum; Metallurgy; V Club 

Wai.ti k Aim 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy; Secretary, Y. M. C. 

A.; Arts and Crafts; Lutheran 

Students 




Dorothy Ai SMAN 
"Dot" 

F.Ik Mound, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C A.; Science Club; Home 
Economics Club 

Dewey Barich 

Hibbins. Minnesota 
Y. M. C A.: Arts and Crafts 



Hi km an Bltros 

"Loin" 

"S" Club; F. O. B. 



A LRU ii N BELANG1 k 

"Ircmhic" 

Eveleth, Minnesota 

Marquette-LaSalle; Arts and 
Crafts; Rifle Club 




* 




( N\\ \i I) BtRC 

"Ossie" 

Whitehall. Wisconsin 

S. T. S.; Stoutonia; Lutheran 
Students 



I AMI s Bl KNDT 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 
Mens Glee Club; S. T. S. 



PAULENE Boxf.sho 

"Paul) " 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

Vice-President, Philomathean; Y. 

W. C. A. President: Secretary, 

Women's Council; Tower 

Harold Brandt 

"Susie" 

Waketield, Michigan 

F. O. B. 




\\ \ i \i Branshaxt 
"Bra,uh" 

Elmwood. Wisconsin 



A I K I Bl I DON 

'• \l" 

Park I .ilK. Wisconsin 

Vice-President, Pegasus; Philoma- 

thean; Home Economics Council; 

Marqucttc-LaSalle 



Irvin Buss 

Menomonic. Wisconsin 

F. O. B.; Forum 



Mary Carmodv 

Fennimore, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C. A.; Secretary. Marquctte- 

LaSalle 



$ 



Miwn Chrok 

"Chronic" 

Poskin. Wisconsin 

Pegasus; Women's Glee Club; 
Home Economics Club 

Am ii l)i \ss 

River Palls, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club: V. W. C A.; W. A. A. 



Arthur Dew 
"Art" 

Wausau. Wisconsin 

"S" Club; K. F. S.; Marquctte- 
LaSallc 

Pali Doi i i 

"Mittnou " 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 

President, S. T. S.; Tower; Indus- 
trial Education Forum; Marquette- 
LaSallc 




Catherine Ebmi r 
"Wee" 

Virginia, Minnesota 

Secretary, Y. W. C A.; Vice- 
President, Home Economics Club; 
Philomathean; Glee Club 

Mildred Fitzpatrk k 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSallc; Science Club; 
Home Economics Club 

Vivian I-iorin 
"V'/r" 

Cochrane. Wisconsin 

Pegasus; Vice-President, Science 

Club; Home Economics Club; Y. 
W. C. A. 

Jane Fori 1 1 k 

Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Philomathean; Tower; Home Econ- 
omics Council; Marquette-l.aS.illc; 
\1. A. P. 




« 




(.ii \n Johnson 
"Tufjy" 

Menomonic. Wisconsin 

"S" Club 

Ml 1 VIN K\OI I 

"Mel" 
\clnu. Wisconsin 

Y. M. C. A.; Stoutonia; S. T. S. 



Ci airi Km ison 
"Knuir 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 

Band; F. O. B.; Men's Glee Club 

1 1 \l liK KHART 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

W. A. A.; Glee Club; Home 
Economics Club; Y. W. C. A. 




Yi i ma Gu n issi r 

Chippewa Falls, WisconMii 

Vice-President, W. A. A.; Secre- 
tary. Arcme; Home Economics 
Club 

I IN ION H.MNI K 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 



Rl l Bl N 1 I \NsON 

"Hans" 

Alexandria. Minnesota 

Arts and Crafts; Rifle Club; 
Tumbling 

John Harmon 

"jack" 

Eau Gallc, v 
M. A. P.; "S" Club; Marquettc- 

LaSalle 






CHARI 1 S I K\NC J I 

"Cbas" 
Gilbert, MilUM 
Marqucttc-LaSallc 



< IS GrII I 1 111 

"Goober" 

Jacksonville, Illinois 

Band 



< Iordon Funk 

"Gee ("k" 

Rib lake. Wisconsin 

Vice-President, F. O. B.; Lutheran 

Students 

Mam (.imsmkian 
Madison, Wisconsin 

M. A. P.; Women's Glee Club; 
Ritle Club; Tower; Archery Club 




W'ii 1 1 am S. Miller 
"Bill" 

Baraboo. Wisconsin 



Robert Murray 

"Bnb" 

Janesville, Wisconsin 



C.i ii FORD \ 

"Cliff" 

Waukegan, Illinois 

Metallurgy 



Ra>, MOND 

Eau Gallc. Wisconsin 








Marion Hii m i 
Stoddard. Wisconsin 

W. A. A.; Rifle Club; Y. W. C A. 



Mr IAIN 1 ll NDl KM N 

"Hendy" 
Biwabik, Minnesota 

Marquette -1 



Belinda Hi ndri< kno\ 

-i.iu.hr 

monie, Wi 

Tower: Hyperian; Secretary. Horn-.- 

Economics Club; V. W. C A.: 

Home Economics Senate 

! K Ml NI>Kl: KSON 

omonie, Wisconsin 
Secretary-Treasurer, Science Club; 
rian; Home Economics Club; 
! [ome Economics Senate 



r 


^^r 


Mil 


H , - 


& 




m w 


**M 


mm i 





James Iverson 

"Jimmy" 

Irene, Sou tli Dakota 
Arts and Crafts 

Robert Jakoubek 
"Rabbi" 

Phillips, Wisconsin 

\l. A. P.; Tower; Stoutonia; Arts 
and Crafts 



ROB] ki |i NSI N 

"Einstein" 

Boyccvillc, Wisconsin 

Vice-President. Arts and Crafts; 
Band 

( -i ki i \iu> Johnson 
"Johnny" 

Crystal Falls, Michigan 
Band; Arts and Crafts 



# 



Charles E. Harmon 
"Chuck*' 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 
Orchestra; Band; Men's Glee Club 

Hi RBERT Haase 
"Herb" 

Menomonic, Wisconsin 
S. T. S. 



Rl III I loSSM \N 
Menomonic, Wisconsin 
S. M A.; Y. W. C. A. 

I i • n i i I Ii Bl 
"In" 

Marshall, Wisconsin 

Marquette-I aSallc; Home Econom- 
ics Council 




Luc is Larson 

"Initio" 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 
Lutheran Students 



John Lanckton 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. T. S. 



Edna Langsi m 

W'orthington, Minnesota 

Philomathean; Y. W. C A.. Vice- 
President; Stoutonia: Tower 

I \\\ Kl N< 1 I OPP 

"Larry" 
Gilbert, Minnesota 

S. T. S.; Stoutonia; Marquette- 
LaSalle 









Darri ! I Rl DGR1 N 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



Al I Kl I) Rl IMIOI I) 

- yp 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 

Tower: \" ice- President. S. T. S.; 
tary, Arts and Crafts 



Edith Rtter 
"Ede" 

Belmont. Wisconsin 
Hyperion; Y. W. c \ 

John Roim 

Bloomer, Wisconsin 

Marquctte-LaSalle 




I AW RJ \< I I IlMl S 

Sawyer, North Dakota 
Rifle Club 



I Ii NRY I low I 

"Hank" 

Brodhc.ui. Wisconsin 

President, Y. M. C. A.; Band; 
Stoutonia 



Roy I low \ki> 
"C/.uit>l>\ " 

Waukegan, I Hindis 

V. M. ( . A. Cabinet; Tower; 
Treasurer. Arts .uu\ Crafts 

low in Ml mi 

"Eddie" 

( )sseo, Wisconsin 
Y. M. C A. 



Edward Rom mi i dt 
• Rosy" 

Rib Lake, Wisconsin 

Stoutonia; Secretary-Treasurer. 

Band; S. T. S. 

Gordon Ross 

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 
Arts and Crafts; Tumbling 

Gl KM \K1) R.OJ 

"Gay" 

Stanley, Wisconsin 
Treasurer. K. F. S.; Tower 



Ai i \ki> Row i 
".11" 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Band; Rifle Club; Tower 



♦ 




LORRAIM Si 1 INURING 

"Lorry" 

Fall Creek, Wisconsin 

Vice-President, Band: Treasurer. 

V. W. C. A.; Areme; W. A. A.; 

Stoutonia 

C.i ORG! Si 1 w art 

Palmyra. Wisconsin 

Band; Rifle Club 



Harold Steen 

"S/tt it" 

Ossco, Wisconsin 
Secretary. Metallurgy; Tower 

Harold Tietz 
"Off 

Menomonie, \\ iNconsin 

S" Club; Tower; S. T. S.; Student 
Athletic Manager 





(fo 



Aucun S< hi umpf 
"Augif" 

Durand. Wisconsin 

Tower: Band; K. F. S. 



Marie Schroi di r 

GrantOn, Wisconvin 
Philomathean 



i is \r Siro 
North Hibbinj;, Minn. 

Ori n P. STAMSTAD 
"Siamic" 

Black River Falls, W r isconsin 

Editor-in-chief. Tower; Men's Glee 
Club; Metallurgy; K. 1 . S.; Indus- 
trial Education Forum 







Charlotte McNab 

Taylor, Wisconsin 

Tower: Hyperian; Treasurer. Rifle 

Club; Home Economics Club; 

Home Economics Senate 

Irene Meyer 

Withce, Wisconsin 

Pegasus Club; Tumbling; Home 
Economics Club 



I)\\ ici H \l< HOI s 

"Nick" 

Jackson, Ohio 
Tower 



Kari. Mn 1 1 R 
Farmington, Minnesota 

President. M. A. P.; Men's Glee 
Club; Rifle Club 



$ 

SV 



Ai i< i Lyni M 

Baldwin, Wisconsin 

Hyperian; Home Economics Club 



(,i *DYS LYNUM 

"Glad" 

Baldwin. Wisconsin 
V. W. C A. 



Doroi in M \ddi N 

"Dot" 

Port Edwards. Wisconsin 
S. M. A. 

M IRGAR1 i M< M.\ 

"Mm " 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club 




Emma Nf.vtby 

Applcton, Wisconsin 

Hyperian; Secretary, S. S. A.; 
Stout Student Advisory Board; 
M. A. P.; Home Economics Senate 

Mn is Olson- 
Si rum, Wisconsin 
Y. M. C. A. 



Evelim Peterson 
"Pete" 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Home 
Economics Club 



I wi r Robi kiso\ 
"Jan" 

Winnebago, Minnesota 

Philomathean; Tower; Band 








1 I I WOK \ I IU.IN 

Dallas, Wisconsin 
Archery Club; Glee Club 



\\\\ Wimmw 
"A fine" 

Stambaugh, Michigan 

Glee Club; Home Economics Club; 
V. W. C A.; Lutheran Students 



SlT.Nl I K W'kK.II 1 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Ruth Zimmi rman 

"Rutbn" 

Phelps, Wisconsin 
S. M. A. 



Just Juniors 








Sophomore Class 



Officers 

John llockcl . . President 

Dorothy Cain Vice-President 

Marjorie Leonard . Secretary 

Patrick O'Connor . Treasurer 



5 



•PH«tt9l>!F> 



Tjs^aPIIWER /? J2 




m: a. 





HOCKEL 
DOROTHY CAIN 

MARJORIE LEONARD 

PATRICK O'CONNOR 

ARI.INF. SJOSTROM 
ROY LARS 

HERBERT vo[\o\\sKY 

\\\! in Mcdonald 

JOHN I.IIKH KV 

LEO SCHN1 ID1 R 

MILDRED NELSON 

CHARLES ROMINI 



GLEN OLSON- 
MARGUERITE ROETTIGER 
CHESTER HYLLAND 



JOHN RADTKE 

JUN1 VERY 

ERHART CARLSON 



MYRTLE SVC ANSON 

LAVERNI HANSI N 



VI RNA DAVIS 

LLOYD WILSON 



Pat' 54 



'^■AfKIIWEK/<7J2 



hi k\ii pi n KSON 

GLADYS 

EDWIN PAHL 



CHARIFS HARMON- 
CHARLOTTE McCARTY 
CLIFFORD TWI I D 

ALVIN PAH] 

CATHERINE MORRIS 

MAURICE HANSON 



IUR SCHM 

SE LEE 
SCOTT DAVISON 

VC'H I IAM UPSON 

MILDRED VOSS 

1 ARI SMITH 

IVAN DAVIS 

: [1 \ STOR 

FORR1M 5ISSI I 

HARTVICK DOTSI IH 
INEZ Xll\o\\ 

HARV] V N OUR SI 



HOWARD SANDVIG 

DOROTHY BOODY 
KM TRINKO 














XIIWI3K 




I! \\ GOOD 

OV] MADSEN 

LILLY [OHNSON 



ROSANNA III RRIGES 

I awkim I HOYT 

RUTH HOWISON 



PHYLLIS GRAY 

ELBERT BARNHART 

HI UN SC II.WM 



DOROTHY Ml PP 
\n ivin PECK 

RUTH oki RLUND 

I V! I V.\ HUM 

BORDEN STEEVES 

VIRGINIA HARMS 



RUTH GRAHAM 

( I ARENCE CARLSON 
!Kl M HEIDE 



MARIE KOHL 

ANSI I ANDERSON 
II AN A \! I DON 



M I MA ANDERSON 

Kl< HARD t IOW 

GLADYS MlKKl LSON 



l\ige & 



r 7>stf-BiiweK/<7j:? 



\ III R\IAN 
HARRIET MELGES 

HERBERT IVERSON 



AM I I lie: 

RUTH TAFEL 



|l \l TRAS 

MARIAN RHIEL 
w ii I i.wi B 



RODIRK K PURi 

MILDRED NICKEL 
NORMAN 



MONTH I. 

RUTH JOI I 

HENRY LEWIS 



RAYMOND JOI 

MAR IMA BUBECK 

HAROLD RASM 



MARGARET DODDS 
I II I.IAN Ml Bl 

lil.RNIIARDT BEGUHN 



MARIAN R< 

ESTHER LEE 
EVERIS 



Pa t e S7 











w* 




Pagt y 



Freshman Class 

Officers 

Stuart Anderson . President 

Harold Sack . Vice-President 
Anita Nelson . . .Secretary 

Virginia (iunz . . Treasurer 



ll'ltSHKIf* 



T/«-BIIWEK/7J2 





si l WART ANDERSON 

ANITA \i LSON 
VIRGINIA 

ROl AND ! V] v 

GR \c l JOHNSON 

IWlls JOHNSTON 

MARII BOU1 \\<-i R 

i\ll! OLSON 

is Mil ii i KOSS 
LLOYD LAKE 

A I [( I McCLURG 

MARRY KELLER 

MARII IMMI R 

JOHN MIDI A 
DORIS II i 

(HAKIIs PETERSON 
LANK I III NNING 

ill INKic II GAERTNI R 
Al l< i \! EXANDER 

■I DOVI I 
KATHERINI WATSON 
w ill [AM PEARSON 
VIOLET s( HIM [NGSTAD 

KARL LOHR 

SOPHIE IEATRAN 
PAU1 TRINKO 

I IVIRA GARB] R^ 









/^V>2\ 1 




Pate 6o 






'~^fXIIWKK/<7J2 



ALBERT FEIRER 

I VELYN ALVORD 
LEVIS Bl KG] R 

EDITH DUKERSCHIEN 

IAMES NEVERDAHL 
ADELAIDE LARSON 
FRANCIS SHAW 

MARIAN M< : ARTHUR 

PALI HANS] \ 

PHYLLIS ST! Ill 

I R BUI I 1 R 
I U< I! I 1 M EMING 

( I ARI Nc 1 I I DIN 

MARGARET MOSI R 
CHARMS ROVE 
DORIS BRADLEY 

! R PUHL 

A VOIGHT 
WOODRUS HORMANN 
MARIAN BROWN 

CHARLES BEHRINt.l R 

FLORENCE McDON KLD 
HERBERT JACH 

RUTH (.1 IM K r 

Hi A I 
MARY SWISTON 
RUSSEL1 \l\V 

HI RMINA SCHMUT2 




Pagt 6t 












OTWBIIWBK/7J2 







Al l< I NIC HOIS 

DOROTHY M KIM 
V l UNA DAMM 

FR] DERI< K CURRAN 

U(llll l).\\l\l 

(Mill KIM HELLER 

c.l R.TRUDE LOTW IX 
ERNEST COROSOLLA 

LORAINi AUSTRIA 

GEN1 Mi \ i \ni II im.\i> 
VIVIAN HAJ VORSON 
(AMES GOVIN 

1AI III! KAMP 
|\xi GREEN 

EILEEN MAU 
PHILIP PR] V 

ARDIS DE LONG 
JANET MILLER 

! li.BV si i PANEK 

DOXAI.I) Mill AR 

ROSE FOR NO 

VIOl \ I ARSON 

MILDRED I XI I 

01 ivi mil AND 

MAGDA1 ENA w II I) 

IOIISI DLKIRSC Mil X 
FLOREN( I GRE1 X 
WANDA ROONEY 




-"-. r »■" 












1/ \/\J 



Page 6j 



'7^3BIIWER/7J2 



OI.IVI SHANNON 

WILLARD SCHUI.TZ 
MARLYS RICHER1 

It I NI.WUN LOHRIE 

MARGAR] I Vl-OOD 
l l>\\ ,\K1) LIEN 

HELEN DII-DRICH 

1 AVKINC 1 WOISkl 

ELVIRA Ni I SON 

GEORGE OTTER! KM I 

I Dill! JOHNSON 
< VKll JOHNSON 

MARJORIE STA< KESTAD 
ELVOOD HUGDAHL 

i I l ANOR HANSMAN 
1 RVIN SMITH 

HELEN MARVIN 

JER0M1 SVANSON 

1 1 i/\i'-i in < illusion ii 

HAZELTON 1 1 1 s\\ ok ill 

DOROTHY SALZMAN 
1 l ROY CHARLICK 

ATHELYN I'll l RSON 
CAR I BRENNER 

DELTA SCHROEDER 
EARNEST EBERT 

RUTH LEONARD 
1 1 AR I A N 1 ) Vi'OODWORTH 



Page is 




In Memoriam 




Doris Linker 
1913-1931 

La Crosse, Wisconsin 



Pag* *t 



In Memoriam 




1913-1931 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



Pate 6} 



w 



orthy use of leisure! 

Extra-curricular activities! 

They are not " inaction, 

but a higher kind 

of activity." 

Not so important 

is what we do, 

as how we do it, 

and when. 

From work or leisure 

animated by a true spirit 

profit comes. 






iBiHJSTinr 



M'ork! 

Thank <iod for the might 
of it. 

The ardor, the urge, the 
delight of it. 

Morgan 



r 77S^KIIWBR/<7J2 







Carl Roll 




DMIN'ISTRATIYI-: ability, scholarship, interest, and 
enthusiasm in school activities are qualities considered 
n the selection of an S. S. A. President. 

Carl Roll has been an able and enthusiastic pres- 
ident this year; he has succeeded in gaining student 
co-operation and participation in college activities. 







Page 67 







>^BIIWEK/<7J2 




Emma 



I lannon 



Gail G 



The Stout Student Association 

^^^^ HE Stout Student Association is the student government organization of The 
■ tl Stout Institute. Every student, upon enrollment and payment of the student 
^^ J activity fee. automatically becomes a member. Through this organi/a- 
^^^ tion all school activities are directed, the S. S. A. officers acting as repre- 
sentatives ot the student body before the Joint Committee on Student Affairs. 



S. S. A. Oil ICERS 



Carl Roi i 
Gail Galloway 

Emma Ni vun - 

Henry Harmon 



President 

Vice-President 

S retdry 

Treasurer 







l' age 6S 



0)S^ailWBK/7J2 




William Rowc 
John llockel 



Mary Jane Dodaon 

thy tain 






Robert Gunn 



The Stout Student Advisory Board 

'^^^ I IE Stout Student Association Advisory Board is composed of the presidents 
a C\ and vice-presidents of each of the tour classes and the tour S. S. A. officers. 
w J The Board acts whenever necessary on all matters pertaining to student af- 
^^^ fairs mk\ interests. On certain questions the Board meets with the Joint ( 
mittee on Student AlTairs. 











OREX ST A 



'Trs^MWHR /77:2 



The 1932 Tower Staff 



Oki \ Si IMSTAD - 
D* K.i ll \u HOI S 

Bl I IM'A I ll NDKK RSON 

Char 1 <>i 11 M< \,\n - 
Pai mm Boni sho - 
Harold STEEN - 

MlSS CAI I All AN 



- Editor-in-Chief 
Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Organization Editor 
Organization Editor 

- Organization Editor 

l.itcrars, AJ 1 /sir 



The title of the student publication of the Stout 
Institute, The Tower, is drawn from the symbol 
ot the College tower which rises above the Industrial 
Education building. The Junior class assumes the 
responsibility for the publication of the yearbook. 



Top rote: !>. Nichols, K. Adcs, .1. !<■ I ' illahan. 

R. Howard, P. Boncsho, E. Langaeth, J. Potller, I'. Doyle. 




h 




Page 70 



r >^KIIWKR/<7j;2 



The 1932 Tower Staff 



Al I KI I) Rl IMIOI I) - 



J 



Paui Doyzj 

Ai i \rd Row l 

Evelyn Adi s 
Jam r Robertson 



Robert J ikoubi k ' 

| \\l Foi I I 1 R * 

I II I Ian Sn I'.i :;nn 

I i>\ \ ! INGS1 in I 

Gerhard Roi i 

M S( MIIMI'I 



Haroi i) Tn r/ 

M \ki (,( i i SSAR1AN 

Roy Howard 

Mr. I I 



J 



Business Manager 

- 

Features 

- Art 



- Atbletu t 

Staff Photographer 

Business .1, 




ALFRED RKIXHOLD 



hlumpli. C. McXab, R. Jakoubck. 
A. K..wc. M. « ■ 




Pagt ,-■■ 



^Af»IIWER /<7J2 




LAURIE 1.1 H TO 



The Stoutonia 



Laurie Lehto 

John I \\< i. ion 

Everis Nelson 

Merlin Wagner - 

Gfrtrude Kei LMAN 
Edna Langseth 
John Butenhoff 

[ban Goon 
Jane Green 
Carmen Sprhn-r 
Robert Jakoubek 
Sophie Jeatran 

I li \iu 1 -low I 
Arthur Schwartz 
Roderick Purcell 



Managing Editor 

I irst Semester 

Editor-in-chief 

First Semester 

Managing Editor 

Second Semester 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Second Semester 

NeWi Editor 

- A si- is hint News Editors 

News Reporters 

Feature Editor 

- Feature Assistants 



The Stoutonia, the weekly publication of The Stout 
Institute, is written and published by the students. 
1c sets before the public the accomplishments and 
aims of the institution, the results of research work 
in the field of Home Economics and Industrial Edu- 
cation, the reports of college activities, and the 
student opinions and desires. 



Tcp rm : Mr. Hague, E. II i. Upp. P. Millar 0, Berg, L. Steirtbri WJ, G, K^man- 

row; i . Ro»enfe!dt, .1. Good, J. Green, R *■ JawwB*, M. Knott, 




Peg* ?-' 






'~fts^BIIWEK/9 r J2 



The Stoutonia 



Earl Halverson - 

Edward Rosenfeldt - 

Car i. Brenner / 

\\ ii i [am Upson > 

Don \i i) Mm ,\k ' 

Marsh \i i Mm i ar n 

Helen Sc hnase 

roj i irson i 

Wii I [AM Ml KK v> \ 

Martha Bubi < k / 
Ruth Graham 

I. ii I [AN Sii Bl RNS I 



Mi i vin Knoi i 

LORRAIM Sill 



f 

NBRING I 



Cari BEIN] ki 

Oswoi i) Bl RG 

I AW R| \< I Lopp 

Mr. I w ii ii 
Mr. 1 1 \< i i 



Business Manager 
Adt ertising Manager 

\dvertising Assistants 

- Win'-. Athletic Editors 

Women's Athletic Editor 

Men's Organizations 

Women's Organizations 

- Business Staff 

Mechanical Foreman 

Machine Composition 

Head Setter 

- Advisen 




[off, W, Union, VV. Murray, E. Langscth, S. Jcatran, J. Lanckton, Mr. Favilte. 
Ih'tiom r, :, : c. Bcinert, M. Bubeck, II. Schnasc, C. Brenner, I.. Sicbcrns. II. Ilowc, R. Purccll. 




Pat* ?i 



'Tts^KIIWKK /<7J2 




Willi V\l Ml-RUAV 



The Stout Typographical 


Society 




William Mi kkai 


President 




First Semester 


I'm i Doi ii ... 


President 




Second Semester 


Ai i ki i) Ri [NHOl i> - . 


Vice-President 


Roy Larson - 


Secretary 


Roiu RT (it NN 


I reasurer 


Mr. Hague .... 


Adviser 



Top rou -. Mr. Hague, J. Berndt, n. Tietx, D. Green, II. Haue, L. Letho. 
Hoitom row: B. Stevens. E. Stindt, R, Laraon, I.. Wilaon, M. Knott. \. Reinbold. 




Pag* ;; 



r fts^MWEK/7J2 



The Stout Typographical 
Society 

The Stout Typographical Society provides closer 
cooperation among those men who are preparing to 
teach printing. Membership in the S. T. S. is divided 
into three degrees, recognizing the progress of the 
individuals in knowledge and experience in this par- 
ticular work. The meetings arc devoted to talks and 
open discussions on the problems which confront a 
teacher of printing. 




I'Afl. DOYLE 



Top row: L. I-opi>. w Baxter, V Thorson, K. Pureed, c". Hocrnemann, 
Bottom raw: E. Roaenfcldt, C. Beinert, l>. Millar, <'.. Olaon, E. Biwer, R. Gunn. 





A. 






Pate 75 







r >>VtfKllWEK/ < 7J2 




KAMI. Ml LI. IK 



Manual Arts Players 



Ml! I I R 
Gl KIKl 1)1 Kl I I MAN 

Mil DRED Haggard 
Lawrenci 1 Ioyt - 
Miss Hassler - - 



idcnt 
-President 

- Treasw r 

- Director 



The Manual Arts Players began in 1921 .is .» little 
cheater movement, with the production of one act 
plays. It has become a dramatic organization which 
takes an active part in school life, offering extra- 
curricular work to those people who are interested 
in dramatic study and interpretation. 



I 


















'^^KHWKK /<7J2 



Manual Arts Players 



•;iip of the grcup is limited to forty. 
Election to the organization is earned through in- 
dividual try-outs at the beginning of each semester. 
The plays which are produced each year offer op- 
portunities not only in acting, but also in 
lighting, costuming, furnishing, and management. 




<;i:utuii>i: kki.i.m \n 



. i R 
l\ rhrson. M • ■ - d. J. Tr»i 

II. Strotinsky. V.. I^ihric. 







O^BIIWER/?^ 




JOHN BUTENIIOPF 



Metallurgy Club 



John Bu i i nhoi i 

Ow N Si wisi ai> 

Harold Shin - 

Cl II I OKI) MOKIM : I ! 

Mr. Mm m s 



Pi 

Vice-President 

S i retary 

- Treasurer 

Adviser 



student in the Industri.il Education Depart- 
ment who is interested in metal work and who has re- 
ceived training in the metal shops may become a 
member of the Metallurgy Club. The organiza- 
tion affords its members an opportunity to supple- 
ment the knowledge gained in the regular class work. 



Top r. 

|. Triako, R Bum. G. 1 I 

I 




^> 




,' tf4 1* 






r 77Vif»llWEK/<7j;? 



Industrial Education Forum 

William Micheels - - - President 
Robert Reick .... Vice-President 
Carl Beinert Secretary 

Georoi Bi*i r Treasure 



The Indimri.il Education Forum i- a group of In- 
dustrial Education students and instructors organ- 
ized two years ago for the purpose of studying 
significant trends in Industrial Education and chang- 
ing factors in its teaching, of promoting high schol- 
arship, and of developing character and initiative. 




WILLIAM MICHEELS 



\ 'A :::. 11-- 1 . Roll. 

II. II 1, P, Doyle, I 




Pose 79 




MR. < 



r fts^aRMWEK/<7j:? 



The Men's Glee Club 



Theodori Pierson 

Wll 1 JAM J. Row 1 - 
Al Bl iu II INSON - 

H. F. Good - 

Mrs. \\'\i i \< i R. Mnc in i i 



President 

- Vh 

S y-Tretsvrer 

• Director 

Pianist 



The Men's Glee Club is one of the oldest cxtra-cur- 

ricular activities in the college. It has bsen an 
organization since 1914. Try-outs are given on a 
competitive basis at the beginning of each school 
year. Appearances are made ac different 
throughout the year. 



Top » F. Clin in. 

A. Hanna, C. K II. Sloe, ! Haas-*. O 

K . Mitchell. Mr. Gocd, T. Picraon, W. Rowe, i H 







T*^BUWEK/7J2 



The Women's Glee Club 



Myrtli Anderson 

M\Kii BURBIDGE 
Dorothy Cain 



President 

Vice-President 

S retary 



Marion Rhiel Treasurer 

Jane Green - - - - Librarian 

Miss Ri .... Director 



The Women's (ike Club is .» group of young wo- 
men interested in the study of the best music. The 
members are chosen from the student body after a 
voice test. The organization appears before the 
assembly from time to time during the year. An 
annual spring concert is given. 




MISS REYNOLDS 



Tof row. J. Kvana, M. Burbidge, M. Krakcr, M. Rhiel, R. Okerlund, I>. Salzman, V. 

Middle row. ». Ebmer, 1>. Boody, M. Ciuleaacrian, <». HyHand, Mis* K l Leonard, M. Andcr 

\l. Bubcck, .1. < •• 

Rollout »<>:<: I. GilberUon, .1. Lockhart, M. Stackeatad. A. Weatman. M. Chroiiquist, \. Buascy, I, K< 







r 7TȣTtKmnBU/91^ 




The Stout Band 



Mif. in<;k\iia\i 



I Kl Ml I DO CaIRI I. LI - 
LORRAINI StEINBRTNG - 

Edvard Rosenfeldt - 
(ii \ki i s [ngraham 



President 

- Vice-President 

S i tary-Treasurer 

- Director 



Any student who can play an instrument is eligible 
to membership in the Stout Band. Rehearsals arc 
held once a week. Practice in directing is offered. 
The Band plays at the football and basket-ball games, 
in the assembly, and at various school functions. 





' fr 




sliyfhflu 



Page Sj 



r 7**£TWirBU7<7J2 



Orchestra 



Haroi i) K \s\u SSEN - 
Okii Johnson - 
I :i i ian I h i i \ND - 



- President 

- Vice-President 

- Secretary-Treasurer 



Mr. GROBF /) 

Mr. Ray Ad\ 




MR. GROI1K 



The Stout Orchestra furnishes .in opportunity for 
extra-curricular activity to all men and women stu- 
dents who are sufficiently proficient and interested 
in orchestra work. The Orchestra plays for most 
of the college functions. 







■X-v 



Pan S) 







r ^-AfKIIWKK/<7J2 




i l> KI.l.IS 



The Arts and Crafts Club 

Donald Ellis President 

Robem Jensen - - - Vice-President 
Alfred Rejnhold .... Secretary 

Roy Howard Treasur > 

Mr, Kranzusch - - - - Iviser 



\ \ R 

Smith, 




?usW£ki. 




/'age Si 



0-^fXMWER/<7j:? 



The Arts and Crafts Club 

When the Dc Molay Club disbanded last spring, 
some of its more active members organized the Art- 
and Crafts Club. This club gives its members an op- 
portunity to become familiar with all the crafts 
and to do extra-curricular work in those crafts in 
which they are especially interested. 




ROrtF.RT liASI N 



CorowUa. I>. Green. R. H 

Bottom row: li !. Sack, K. Sir... W. bck. 















/■fr^MWBK/^JS 




( I.Ain SSK S'KSS 



Philomatheans 



Claryssi Ness President 

Pauuni Bonesho ... Vice-President 
Mar.iorh Leonard ... - Secretary 
Mildred Nelson .... Treasurer 

\!>ss \in 1 1 r . - . . . . .\./i iter 
Mks. Pa i i \\ ii son - - - Associate Adviser 



Tof r,.:. Mri Wilton, M. Kelson, l». Salsman, I- Lee, \ Beedon, M. Haggard, J. Foeller. 
Bottom ■ !!.::>-:. I ». Cole, M. McArthur, A. Osirom, R, Johnson, !•".. Nelson, I.. SUi>crii*. 




Peg* M 






r ^/tfXIIWEK/<7J2 



Philomatheans 

The Philomaehean Society is the oldest of the three 
social groups for women in the college. The aim 
of the society is expressed in its name. Philomathean. 
the law of higher learning. The meetings, which 
are held twice a month, are devoted to the studv of 
art. literature, and drama. 




F.SHO 



T °l' r " Schr.-K-.lc. .1. Robertson. M. Leonard, Miu Miller 

Bottom rou .. u . M. Schrocder, ■. I. Kom, i 




I Si:,- J; 



T/*FMWB«/<7;p 




r.Aif. <;\i i 



S. M. A. 

Gau Gai loway Pi 

Doris Henr> - Vice-President 

Gertrudi Kellman .... Secretary 
Iihii Anderson .... Treasurer 

Miss Jeteb Ad\ 

Mrs. I. V. Grann - - Associate Adviser 



.11. y. 
in. K. Zimn 




••cusln: 






Pag* ■• 






Ors^BIIWEK/^JS 



S. M. A. 

The S. M. A. was organized in 1922 by a group of 
Home Economics students to provide the opportun- 
ity for closer friendship among girls having similar 
interests and ideals. The society is especially inter- 
ested in those activities which contribute to finer ap- 
preciation in music and art. 




DORIS HKXRY 



7«>r r«:. -. J. Good, V. Gunz, M. : .in. G. Kellman. 

u. Deidrich, L A-artria, K. Hunt, I ■'. Ryan, M. Ricbert, l». Ma<i«lcn, A. I 







I'att *9 







0>^fKim T KK/<7J2 




FLORENCE VI-.UI'.KK K 



Hyperians 



OFFN 

I I OR] N< 1 \"l RBKIC K - 

Mary Jam DoDSON 

Marian HaGMAN 

Emma Hanson 

Miss Burgoin ... 

Mrs. w. B. Davison 



- Presidt >:! 
- Vlce-Pn 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 

Associate Adviser 



W. Ragman, K. Newby, M. Healjr, R. Hendrii 
Bottom r,/.-, : K. \\ ike. K. Hendrickaon, M. Pinter, E, Alvord, K. 





^^V/' 



I'azt 90 



OiHf XIIWI3K J<J J 2 



Hyperians 



The Hyperian Society, a social organization of thir- 
ty young women, was organized in 1923. The so- 
ciety docs SOClill work in the community and is active 
in all school activities. Each year the Hyperians give 
a Christmas party for a group of poor children. 
During the spring months they conduct a weekly 
story hour for Mcnomonie children. 




MARV I AM liuDSON 



T«f- row: E. H.uis..ii, L. Litchfield, A. Lvmim. K. Gilbertson. IfUl Burgoin. 

Bottom raw; Id, Nidcel, .1. Kenning, I. 5tepanck, M. < rest, I , Lee, M. Swiaton. 




Pagt 71 



Ttt^BHWER/yj:? 




LORRAINE l H< II! II in 



The Home Economics Club 

Lorraine Litchfield - President 

Catherini Ebner ... Vice-President 
Belinda Hendrickson ... Secretary 
Ii w Good - Treasurer 

Miss Mk haels < - - - . Adviser 
\!ivs Buchanan ----- Adviser 



The Home Economics Club is a social-study group 
open to all women registered in the School of Home 
Economics. Outside speakers make interesting con- 
tributions to many of the meetings. 



Tor rote: Mia* Buchanan, <.'. Ebner, B. Hendrickaon, \l>*« Michael*. 
Bottom row. I.. Hebl, A. Ilcedon, .I. Ktwllcr, M. II 


















r fts^OTWEK/y , J2 



Y. W. C. A. 



i M BON 

NGSETH - 

Catherini Ebmer 

LORRAINl Si i [NBRIN< 
Evj LYN ! Ilnt 
Lorraine Lit; hfiels - 
Jean Good - 

- >\ 1 I: NDRi; KSON 
\ [RCINIA I [ARMS 



- 

- \ 

See re /iiis 

- Treasurer 

Membership Chairman 

- Social Chairman 

- Program Chairman 

Servi < Chairman 

! Semester 

Social Sen ic- Chairman 

Second Semester 




*A 



l-AII.IM ItOXKSIIO 



In addition to the usual work of the Young Wo- 
men's Christian Association, The Stout Institute 
group has sponsored the Big Sister movement and an 
annual Mother-and-Daughter Banquet. 







r frs^3KHWER/7J2 




WII.I.IVM MKII1II.S 



F. O. B. 



Wll I 1AM Mic Hi I I s 

Stevi ( \ i n«.kos - 

Gordon Funk - 
[rvin Buss 

! il NM I I \\ is - 

(,i ORG! SO! i hi K\ 

Mr. Favilll \ 

Mr. Good 

Mr. Burbridgi. ' 



Pn - 
S 
- Pi 

Second Semester 

- Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Sergeant -at -Arms 

A.!. 



'.! fi - . 11 ■--. \\ 

Roll, W. Hotter, A. Lundcen, l> 




S&r 







Pag* 94 



O^afllWBR/?^ 



F. o. B. 

The F. O. B. is a social organization for men. Can- 
didates for admission to membership must have com- 
pleted one semester's residence .it The Stout Institute. 
The club takes an active part in all school affairs, 
especially in the support of athletics. 




STKVE CVEXGKOS 



> '■-.■ II. Harmon, M. Hanson, II. Zastrow, Mr. Favillc. 

Hottom row: II. Brandt, '•• Funk, II. Lewis, II. Raymond, A. Anderson, r. Johnson. 




Page 95 



™, 




T*^5BHWEK/<7J2 







K. F. S. 



[OS! I'll Neudecker - 
KT GUNN 

I 
(.1 RHARDT R. 

Ioi!\ Hoc ML - 

ARTIIi R 1 I INCI R - 

Mr. Davison i 
Mr. Ray ( 



- President 

- Yuc-Ps 

S i retary 
Tret 

- Historian 
\eant-at-Arms 

Advisers 



Top rote: O. S: 

Rowc. A. Schli 








&§,£ 









Patf« pd 



r ?>s^BilWER/<7J2 



K. F, S. 

In the fall of 1930, the K. F. S. was organized to 
promote knowledge, friendship, and social life among 
the College men. In the fall of 1932 it was 
recognition .1- a college group, and it is now one of 
the leading organizations on the campus. The pres- 
ent active membership is twenty. 







■.:. I. Johnson, <i. I 
\. Will. A. Dchling) Smith. 



k^tk 



Pagt 97 







WEIR 



0-7VtfailWEK/<7J2 



The Pegasus Club 



Hazei Weir - 

A i it i Hi i DON 

Ellen Nelson 
Vivian Florin 

It \i Trash k - 

Loi isi I I 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Program Chair man 

- Membership Chairman 

• Publicity Chairman 



Miss Callahan - - - - Adviser 



The Pegasus Club, which is .m outgrowth of the 
Inky lingers Club, offers .in added opportunitv to 
Study literature to those who are interested. Dur- 
ing the present year the club has discussed certain 
>|$, dramas, and poems. 



. . i . \. Becdon. 





S&5PX.C. 



Pagetf 



T*^MIWEK/7j:? 



Areme 



\i \ \ Aims 
El DKII) W'lM 
\'l I MA (il I « \NM K 



President 

Vice-President 

s<( retary 



Valeria Volp Treasurer 

Miss Bin hanan - - - - Adviser 




AI.VA AI)ES 



Women who arc members of the Order <>t the East- 
ern St.ir compose the membership of the Areme Club. 
Each year the group carries out a definite social pro- 
ject. A silver cup is given to the senior member 
ranking highest in scholarship and generally desirable 
qualities. 



Top rot, Buchanan, I.. Litchfield, V. Volp, K. Anderson, I.. Andreatscn, II. Rricker. 

Bottom \\ ik.-, |>. Moody, M. Dobbs, \. timwasaen, I.. Stcinbi imidl. 




Pate 99 



>y^MWBR/<7J2 




IIKNRY 1U»\\ I. 



Y. M. C. A. 



HENM I low 1 

Hartwick Dotseth 
Walter Ai m - 

HaRVI -i N'OI KM 

Mr. Prh i | 

Mr. Mn sis 

Mr. Johnston ' 



Presidt nt 

Vh President 

■ Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisen 



■ Mr. Johnson, B. Sleeve*, II. Sack, .1. Swanson, R. Larson, II. (Course, u 
»en, M. Ekern, K. Barnhart, M. Knott. 1". Kauta, <I- Ilerrymtyei 





(ticuslra*! 












r 7^KMWER/7J2 



Y. M. C. A. 



The Young Men's Christian Association is .in active 
organization to which all men are welcome and 
through which contacts with young people in other 
colleges may be made. This club makes possible 
the annual Stunt Night Program. The Y. M. C. A., 
with the Y. W. C. A., sponsors the all-school pic- 
nic during the opening week of the first semester. 




irAKTWU K IK.TSITII 



I-".. Hume. I). Barich, II. Valaka, R. Erenion, R. Purcdl. M. Olson, Mr. Milncfl. 
Bottom row. 1». Green, II. Ekern, II. Sandvig, U. Howard, R, May. w 0j», C, Rom, 







, 




Tft^KIIWEK/' 




IIAkni.u RASMI 



Lutheran Students 

Harold Rasmussen .... President 
Chester Hylland - - - Vice-President 

RlimOkirilnd Secretary 

JOHN Medla Treasurer 

Miss I roogatt Adviser 



Ti>f • I«ia. 

Smith. M. Wild, I-. Jornaon, K. ChriMopht Inow, II. Owen, R. Kvcnson 




V?&»' 













r ^fKMWKK/<7j:? 



Lutheran Students 



The Stout Lutheran Student Association is an or- 
ganization of students of the Lutheran faith who 
wish to foster a closer relationship among themselves 
and to further the interests of the Lutheran Church. 




CIIKSTER HVI.I.AM) 



.1. Media. 1.. 1>uW, Roctttger, A. Vcnbcrg, R. Okerlund, I 

Stisi.lt. I. M. Swam 




Page los 






Oy^anWBK/7J-2 







OUR MEMBERS 



Marquette-LaSalle 

Marsiiali Mii.i.ak President 

Joseph Neudecker .... . Vice-President 

Mary Carmodv Secretary 

Patrick O'Connor Treasurer 

Mk. Hansen Adviser 



X 



N 1927, ^c Marquette Club, an organization for Catholic girls, and the La 
Salle Club, an organization for Catholic men, combined to form the Mar- 
quettc-La Salle Club. Meetings arc held twice a month. One of chese is .1 
Sunday morning breakfast meeting. 













r 7yy^MWBK/<7J2 




nsTS 



Science Club 

Ellen Nelson President 

Vivian Florin Vice-President 

Esther Hendrickson Secretary-Treasurer 

Esther Lee Program Chairman 

Margaret Senty Membership Chairman 



ADYIM KS 



Miss B.U iimann 

Mlss \1( I \l)l)|\ 

Miss Mil I 1 R 



Miss Cruise 

Miss Mc ( A I MON I 
Miss 1 i i DOM 



C 



Pflff /05 



HE Science Club is composed of students and faculty members of the college 
who .ire particularly interested in science. At the weekly meetings the mem- 
bers present reviews of recent contributions in science. 




r fr/* r KIIWEK/7j;2 




MARKS \l I N 



The Stout Rifle Club 



K \KI Mil I I R 

Pali ( . \i i s<>\ 
(ii AD1S Si HMIDi 



President 
Vice-President 

S < re tar) 



Charlotti McNab Treasurer 

John Hockei - ... Executive Officer 




^^^j^lli Stout Rifle Club offers members of the Stout Institute instruction and 
■ J practice in the care and use of fire-arms. Weekly indoor target practice with 

^^^^/ 22 caliber rifles is provided during the winter months. High-powered rifles 
.ire used on the outdoor range in the summer. Prizes offered monthly to .1 man 
and to a woman on the basis ot attendance, improvement, and marksmanship have 
added to the competitive spirit ind interest of the members. 







SSlm- 









O^BIIWBK/?^ 




© 



Bertha Tainter Annex 

JUNl TK AM ! K / 

Proctors 

INEZ Nil NO* ^ 

Mil DRI i> Ni : - - 

Vi una Davis -------- Secretary 

Miss Bachmann - ebtress 

hRTHA TAINTER ANNEX, located on the shore of Lake Menomin just 
a short walk from the main buildings <>t' the college, was built by the school in 
190S to serve as a hall for sixty-four 



Pate 107 







O^KIIWEK/<7J2 




HALLITES 



Bertha Tainter Hall 



Catherine Ebni r 
Cathi rim Morris 
Mrs. Dove 



President 

S etary-Treasurer 

Preceptress 



© 



ERTHA TAINTER HALL, which the school bought in 1906 from the James 
Tainter estate and named tor Mrs. Tainter. is a college home for about twenty 
girls. 





Puge toS 



'77V 1 fKHWKK/<7J2 




LYXWOODl 



Lynwood Hall 

James Johnston President 

Ivan Damn Vice-President 

Harold Sack Secretary 

Everis Nelson Treasurer 

Harold Hylr Fellou 



a 



XTIL 1930 Lynwcod Hall was used as a women's dormitory. Since that time 
it has served as a men's dormitory, accommodating freshmen, sophomores, and 
a tew juniors. 




I'agf lot) 








thletics! 

a glorious opening 
for all who thrill 
to keen competition. 
Therein tlu»y find 
the joy of victory, 
the sting of defeat, 
physical prowess, 
mental agility. 
Basket-ball, 
football, 
track, — 
their lesson: 
co-ordination. 



Pane no 



ILI XAa 



Skill: A mart of power, a 
fount of will. 

A form and mould of many 
a star, 

A source and bound of good 
and ill, 

A key of many things that 
are. 

Hnvidsoii 



r 77V*fKllWKK/<7j:2 



The School Sports 

jf^^r HE 1931-32 sports season started enthusiastically. Football practice began 
■ " J during the first week of the semester. A large squad was ably drilled by 
^^^^^ Coach Burbidge and Assistant Coaches R.idkc and Zimmerman. After drilling 
several weeks on fundamentals, the coaches cut the squad to thirty-three men. 
Several practice games were played, one being a night game at Winona. The conference 
schedule began with la Crosse. The other conference games were with Superior, 
River Falls, and Eau Claire. Twenty-two major letters, four miner letters, and four 
freshman numerals were awarded at the end of the season. 

The basket-ball season opened in November. A large group of men, most of 
them yearlings, turned out on the hardwood court. The be^t men of the group were 
found by staging a wild-cat tournament. About twenty candidates were kept on the 
squad. Coach Burbidge kept thirteen men on the varsity team, while Assistant Coach 
Zimmerman supervised the yearlings. Zimmerman's squad scrimmaged the varsity 
twice a week. The Blue and White won twelve games and lost four. Eleven men 
were awarded major letters; two, minor letters; and twelve, freshman numerals. 

The intra-mural >ports were managed by William Murray. The various men's 
clubs competed for the school honors. The sports organized were basket-ball, bowling, 
tennis, and kitten-ball. The S. T. S. has won the first two sports. 

The spring program was centered in football and track. Coach Burbidge handled 
the football tactics, while Zimmerman took charge of track. 



Page lit 




r />« r MIWEK/yj2 




VARSITY MEN 



The Varsity "S" Club 



O 



HE Varsity "S" Club was organized in 192?. The sole purpose of the organi- 
zation is to promote athletics of high standard. To be eligible for member- 
ship, the men must earn their major "S". The letter-winners are given sweat 
ers bv the club. 



OI 1 KIRS 



John Slaughter 
Joseph Spitzn vclj 



President 

- Secretary-Treasurer 




££$&/ 




Pat* n: 



r fr^BnWBK/7J2 




William 






William Baxter 



The Cheer Leaders 



T the beginning of each year, the student body elects the cheer leaders. The 

three men who were given the offices this year were William Hoeser, Henry 

Lewis and William Baxter. Lewis was elected master cheer leader. At the 

end of two years" service the men may receive a letter. Hoeser will be the 

onlv member to receive his "S" in 1932. 




Pate 113 







'T7S^KIIWEK/<7J2 




I-.AK! BURBl 

Physical Education 



The Coaches 











Rai P. ZlMMI RMANN 

I 



Pate 114 



r fts^MiWEIt/<7j;? 




David Stori 



Football Captains 




\ \(.i i 



Pate 11$ 







r fts^BMWEK/ < 7;P 




. Tfoduslni- 



Page lib 






owaeiifrER/yj^ 




JACK, 




8UD 




J. Harmon 

Ta 

1 1. K \\(.\s 
Tackle 

L. Pa i mi k 
Guard 

\\". Nil: ill l i - 

Quarterback 

H. Ellsworth 
Guard 



Page 117 




7y^MWER/<7J2 





















O^BIIWEK/yjS 




Pate iiq 



jl£ 




r ^s^BIIWBB/7J^ 




The 1931 Grid Season 

^^^^III curtain on football opened with the Blue Devils playing a night game at 
■ * J Winona. During the first halt the Blue and White had the edge on the Riv„-r- 
^^^^/ men. The score at the half placed Stout on the short end. The second half 

was disastrous for the Burbidgemcn. Hank Harmon came out of the 
with a broken ankle. Rabbit Bruncss did his share of making long runs. The last quar- 
ter was a punting duel with Stori starring. The score: W'inona 15, Stout 0. Coach 
Burbidge put every man through some stiff workouts in order to beat Mankato. Th^ 
Mankato game was the first on the home field. The first period was slow but thrill- 
|oe Spit/nagle Mid Bert Anderson showed their fleet footed ness by making several 
runs. The first half ended in a scoreless tie. Stori again starred for the Devils 
in punting the pigskin out of the danger zone. The score: Mankato 0, Stout 7. 
playing a hard game, the fellows were thinking of the Maes of Minnesota. The day 
w.is ideal for ducks, but not for a football contest. After a series of slides, the Macs 
came to victory with two touchdowns. Stout's second team saw action during the 
second half. Bud Micheels came into the limelight with his accurate passing attack. 
As the final whistle blew, the game ended with both teams sliding in the middle of the 
field. The score: Macalestcr 19, Stout 6. 

Three non-conference games had passed; the Devils turned to harder competition. 
( rosse was the first conference foe on the schedule. Again the game was played 
on a field of mud. With many men on the injured list, Stori was shifted to the back- 
field. La Crosse had the reserve material which brought a victory for the Redmen. 
The score: La Crosse 26, Stout 0. The next battle was with the St. Paul Luther College. 
The Apostles used their "shock troops" in the opening minutes. Before the first 
quarter ended. Stout had shoved over two counters. Ray Dondlinger smashed the line 
for three touchdowns. The game ended with Stout running down another certain score. 
The score: Stout 2~. Luther 0. The annual homecoming ended with a battle with the 
Superior Ycllowjackcts. The sting was too great for the Devils. The visitors scored 
at will. Stori ended his season with an injured ankle. Ansel Anderson showed his 
ability in punting. The score: Superior 32, Stout 0. The Devils traveled to the Falcon 
camp with high hopes of winning. The first half was a battle for ground, but the 
Blue and White weakened in the final periods. As the final whistle blew. Stout « 
the short end by a score of 5 5 to 0. The final game of the season was against l.ui 
Claire. By a series of passes, the visitors pushed over two counters. This game was full 
of heartaches and thrills. The score: Kau Claire 14, Stout 0. The following men 
played their last game for the Blue and White: Dondlinger, Palmer. Micheels, Cronk, 
H. Harmon. Spit/nagle, Bruness, and Biwer. 








rate ito 



r fts^3EIIWEK/<7J2 




Captain- 
Hi k\i.\\ Blros 
All S/u/i' nurd 



I 



Basket-Bali 



Pan* m 







ZIIWEK 




Pane lit 



oy-^ xiiwni: / 




Page i.'jt 



^s^SHWEK/<7j:? 




THE 1 M < I VIRE GAME 



1932 Cage Season 




J^^^ HE Devils opened the basket-ball season with Luther. Stout players showed 
/ C j supremacy during the entire game. Every Blue Devil saw action. The score: 
^^^^^ Stout 36. Luther 16. The Burbidge men journeyed to St. Paul for two days. 
While there they played St. Thomas and the St. Paul Y. M. C. A. The Blue 
and White won and lost. They lost to St. Thomas 34-20 and won 14-13. During the 
next week St. Thomas again played the Devils. The visitors were on the lead until the 
final minutes. The score: Stout 38; St. Thomas 26. St. Paul "Y" came the following 
week and was downed by the Blue and White by a score of 31-18. The conference 
schedule started with La Crosse. The Rcdmcn could not get through the Devils' de- 
fense. After tumbles and thrills the Devils won 26-22. Eau Claire was the next foe. 
This game advanced in spurts. The Blue and White finally spurted to victory by a 
score of 38-31. On a cold night the Devils battled River Falls. After leading all the 
way, the Devils lost the final punch. The score: River Falls 37; Stout 28. Stout went 
to La Crosse. The Blue Devils failed to show their ability and finished on the short 
end with a score of 19-28. The Yellow Jackets came down to beat the Devils. Borg 
of the visitors brought plenty of thrills to the fans. It was a battle to the finish. 
Stout came through with flying colors. The score: Stout 33; Superior 28. The Fal- 
cons flew to the home floor to play the Devils. Stout took an early lead and kept the 
lead until the final minutes. Two baskets in the final seconds won the game for River 
Falls. The score: River Falls 2y, Stout 25. The Blue Devils journeyed to the north 
to play Superior. The Burbidgemen were handicapped, due to the size of the floor. As 
the game advanced, the Hornets took the deciding lead. The score: Superior 38; Stout 
22. Eau Claire closed the season by playing a close game on the home floor. The score 
of this game: Stout 28; Eau Claire, 24. The following played their final game: Buros, 
Johnson, Hoernemann, Micheels, Bruncss, and Spitznagle. 






Page :.'4 



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; 



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'i 



\- 





John Slaughter 



Harold Tleu 



Student Athletic Managers 

^41^^ HE athletic department selects two students to take charge of the athletic 
■ » I supplies. Each student becomes a manager for one sport, working for one 
^^^^/ season or more. These men learn bandaging, taping, and care of equipment. 

Before they can earn letters, they must do two years of work. This j 
managers were John Slaughter and Harold Tietz. 



I'age iti 




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BlRNK! RlVNOlDs 

Direct I ducatlon 

j<,r Wont I il 



Women's Sports 



Page U7 



V 3 '■*• 





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W. A. A. 



MILDRED HAGGARD 


OFFICERS 






Mn dred Haggard 


President 




V i i MA GUTVASSER 


Vice-President 




I 11 1 IAN SlEBERNS - 


Secretary 




M \K(,\iu T DODDS - 


Treasurer 




I'm i i is Gray - 


- Point Secretary 












ilic, l. Trajtek. J. Lockbart. P. Gray. K. Hangman. 
Bollon -. M. Rocttigcr, E. Hansen. D -■ , Scrn*. 



S^Sw^V 





Page i.'S 






^s^fXIIWKK/7J2 



W. A. A. 



The Women's Athletic Association is an organiza- 
tion of young women who are active in sports. 
Hockey, flashball, basket-ball, swimming, volley ball, 
skating, baseball, and hiking are a part of their pro- 
gram. Points are received for participation in these 
activities. Pins, emblems, and finally the school let- 
ter may be earned. 




VEI.MA GUTWASSER 



!>. Salximn, A Dcana, I Johnson, M. Bubcck, M. Dodds, < \.,«. i.. Stelnbring. 
Bottom rw: M. Rotuh, M. Hcikcl, E. Anderson, M. (:.-.. \. Harm**, M. Boulanger, M. Leonard. 




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Inter-Class Basket-Bail 

HE final game tor the Inter-class basket-ball championship was played between 
the seniors and the sophomores on February third. The play at the beginning 
of the game was slow, but the thought that this was the decisive game awak- 
ened enthusiasm. 



The final score was 7-4 and the silver cup denoting championship went to the 
sophomore team. 

Members of the winning team were: 

Martha Bubeck 
Marguerite Dodds 
Phyllis Gray 

nia Harms 
1 [arriet Mclges 
Margaret Roet tiger 
Lillian Sieberns 
Carmen Sprieter 
June Trastek. 







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THE PHILO 

Inter-Society Basket-Bali 

ON February sixteenth, the Philomathean Society won from the S. M. A." 
live game in the inter contest for the basket-ball championship. 

The end of the first quarter found the scores running fairly uniform. 

i of the half, the Philos led with a score of 1 2 to 5. By the beginning 
of the fourth quarter, both teams were noticing the strain cf trying to keep their bal- 
ance en the slippery gym floor. 

The S. M. A. team showed good fight but their shorter average height proved a 
handicap, and the final score was 22 to 5 — a victory for the Philos. 

Members cf the Phi!o team were: 



rage in 



Katherine Graslie 

Mildred Haggard 

Louise Hobari 
. Ness 

Alice Ostrum 
Lillian Sieberns 




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Archery 

UCH interest was created in archery that equipment was purchased and a \\ <> 
men's Archery Club organized. A noted archer was here tor two daya 
ing instruction in the fundamentals of archery. About forty students took 
advantage of the day and evening classes. An outdoor archery tournament 
was held in May. 

Members of the club: 





Martha Bubcck 
A dele Deans 
Vivian Florin 
Bernadine Goke 
Ruth Graham 
M.irv Gulesserian 
Gladys [ngalla 
Louise Lee 
Charlotte McNab 



Harriet Melges 
Catherine Morris 
Clarysse Ness 
Margaret Roet tiger 
Gladis Schmidt 
Lillian Siebcrns 
Phyllis Steele 
Eleanor Vergin 
Mildred Voss 



Page i ;t 






OwTUm/B*/<7J2 




ONE OF Till. ( l VSSES 




Physical Education Classes 

REORGANIZATION of women's athletics has brought variety and stimu- 
lated new interest. The outdoor work consists of fundamentals in English 
field hockey, tennis, archery, and organized hiking. The indoor work which 
was taken up with the approach of winter offered the students a choice of 
fundamental Danish gymnastics, clogging and character dancing, or natural dancing. 
Swimming is a required course. Fundamental Danish gymnastics gives an apportunity 
for physical development and the acquisition of skill. The student strives for flexibil- 
ity, strength, and co-ordination. The two classes given each semester made up the larg- 
est of the women's physical education classes. 



\ 



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s.Wl.vo coki'S 



The Stout Life-Saving Corps 

The Stout Life-Saving Corps is an honorary group made up of women who have 
passed the Red Cross life-saving examinations. The district examiner gives annual ex- 
aminations at the college in the spring. 



Members of The Stout Life-Saving Corps: 
Catherine Ebmer 
Janet Evans 
(Catherine Graslic 

Jane Green 

\l i: \ Gulesserian 

Lillian Sicberns 



Vclma Gutwasser 
Louise Hcbart 
Gertrude Lotwin 
Alice Ostrum 
Grayce Quarters 




■ 



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Swimming 

XN the- swimming classes special attention is paid to the elimination of fear, to 
breaching exen perfection of strokes, and to training in Red Cross lifc- 

saving methods. A variety of novelty stunts was presented this year at the 

women's swimming demonstration which took place on the afternoon of 
March twelfth. Some of the attractions were a candle race, a balloon race, a tub race, 
class relays, floating group formations, a contest of strokes for form, underwater 
swimming for distance, a sculling race, diving exhibitions, and a life-saving demonstra- 
tion. 



Pant 133 







T^»mn«/7J2 




Till. DANCERS 



Q 



The Natural Dancing Class 



ATURAL dancing is rhythmic movement based on such simple motor rhythms 
as walking, running, skipping, and leaping. It is the interpretation of music 
by self-expression through movement. The student works for flexibility and 
co-ordination. Members of this class danced for the Campus Fete. 




tn^ffem.' 









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G 



lose by the campus 
lie the wooded paths — 
a lower campus — 
the lake bank, 
towering pines, 
silver birches, 
luxuriant grass, 
lichen-covered rock, — 
Paradise Valley, 
Riverside Park, — 
soft breezes 
and rippling water. 



Page ifi 



The best of the fight is the 
staying, lad. 

And the best of all games 
the playing, lad. 

If you give them the best 
in you. 

Bobbins 



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JACK HARMON PAULINE BONESHO 

The Junior Prom 

aSHKRIXG in the spring social season, the Junior Prom was one of the most 
delightful formal dances of the year. 
As we entered the modernistically decorated ballroom. Queen Pauline 
Bonesho and King Jack Harmon greeted us. 
Joe Pyer's orchestra . . . the Grand March . . . soft music . . . soft lights . . . 
"the most colorful event of the year" ... a Prom of Proms. 

COMMITTEE 
Robert Jakoubek nation 

Will i.W! Rowr -....- Reception 
Dnxk.iii Xkiiols ..... Entertainment 
Marion Hagman ..... Refreshments 

Maki |\m Hudson ..... Imitation- 

PAUI DOYLI Publicity 

Edward Rosenfeldt ..... Programs 

Ernest Zick - - - - - - - finance 

GUESTS OF HONOR 

President and Mrs. B. E. Nelson Dean and Mrs. M. M. Price 

Dean and Mrs. C. A. Bowman Dean Ruth E. Michaels 

CHAPERONES 
Miss Miller and Guest Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Kranzusch 








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TIIK BALLROOM S< 



The Colonial Ball 

^^^^ HE Women's Athletic Association introduced the idea of a Colonial Ball this 
■ * J year, it being especially appropriate since 1952 is the bi-ccntennial of Wash- 
^^^^ ington's birth. The ball was held in the gymnasium on the evening of Febru- 
ary twenty-second. 
Elected by the student body. Florence Verbrick and Steve Cvcngros represented 
Martha and George Washington; Mary Jane Dodson and Karl Miller represented Dolly 
and James Madison. 













Page 14? 



n^vwwiiii 79 j 2 




A DRAMATU Ml 



Belinda 

Q RESENTED by the Manual Arts Players. April 24th. 1951. 
Belinda, a drama of romance and of poetry was presented by the Manual 
Arts Players in the Stout Auditorium. Clc\cr witticisms added much to the 
interesting theme of the play. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Belinda Tremayru- ------ - Mary Jane Dodson 

Delia, her daughter -------- Phyllis Gray 

Harold Ba\;e: -------- Everis Nelson 

Claude Denenish -------- Laurence Hoyt 

John Tremayne ........ Frank Cassell 

Betty, the maid -------- Alice Hazclrudc 

Director --------- Miss Hassler 



Page iv 




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CARL BKIXERT 



linuis III 



Honor Awards for 1931 




GAIN, .u the end of the school year, we pause to honor th; four students who 
are the recipients of college honors. 

The Eichelberger Scholarships were awarded to two students from the Ju 
nior Class and to two from the Sophomore Class. Doris Henry and Carl 
Beinert, Juniors, and Charlotte \lc.\ab and Clifford Xauta, Sophomores, received the 
awards for 1931. 




pfastn 




$ 




('l.ll'H)Kli NAI'IA 






September 



7. Freshman day — Frosh pass placement exams. Now. watch for displacement ones. 

□ □ □ 

8. Uppcrclassmcn register. Such dignity! 

D □ □ 
11. Have you seen the new teachers? Wonder what kind of quizzes they'll give. 

□ □ □ 

15. Mr. Canine registers in Mr. Bowman's Administration class, thinking it a snap 
course. I inds he is barking up the wrong tree after first taste of the heavy as- 
signments. 

□" D □ 

18. First issue of the weekly funny paper, school scandal sheet, or what have you. It 
looks like a good publication. 

□ D D 

20. The extra men who attended the Y. W. C. A. kid party Friday night have not 
been disposed of. Call at Tainter Hall and buy those gingerbread men at reduced 

[•rices. 

D D D 

24. Hank lewis. Bill Baxter, Bill Hoescr win cheering contest. The boys were .1 howl- 
ing success. 

D D D 

26. Stout 7 — Mankato 0. 

Hyps plead depression when accused of selling dogless hot-dogs at the game. 

D □ □ 

29. Brother Jack sent home to recuperate from results of light housekeeping attempted 
by I .111 Gallc, Eau Galle. and Eau Gallc. 




Page 143 







Oy^ XHWI3K 














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Page 145 



%i 




October 










1. School pictures taken. Certain people grab center o: 

□ U D 

2. V. A. A. m.-.ugurates moonlight hiking. What! No roller skates! 

d n n 

3. Lvnwood holds pyjama parade and pep meeting to send the team off. 

□ D □ 

6. Junior prcxy ready to start things off with a barn;. Explode- when only fourteen 
members are present. 

□ □ D 

8. Mr. I.cfgren thrills assembly crowd with tales of the Byrd expedition to the Ant- 
arctic. Even girls who are afraid of dogs can't resist the uniform and venture- 
near enough to buy a picture. 

D □ D 

10. Squad goes to La Crosse. No startling pyjamas from Lvnwood in evidence at send- 
off. 

□ □ □ 

12. Physical exams — Heavyweights resolve to diet. 
Who's got the seat next to yours for Lyceum? 

□ D D 

14. Upper classmen at Lvnwood neglected by United States postal department. It 
must be the depression. 

c n a 

15. Tower pledges solicited in assembly. 

□ D D 

16. Xo school! Teachers' convention in Eau Claire. 

C D D 



20. First I vecum number. Welsh Sinners make a big hit. Sack displays the hole 
V12>-rxJ> 0°" „.i l:„ u j — t_. __:-_•_ .. .... 



where his tooth used inning at costumes. 







October — Continued 



•■- 



23. Homecoming. Bigger and belter! "Clarence" M. A. P.'s candidate for popular- 
ity. 

□ D □ 

24. \\". A. A. girls stage football game in pep assembly. 

D D D 

2y. Trustees arrived today. Musical talent displayed in special assembly. 

G D D 

30. Eth, Eth. A prexy gets everyone out at 7:30 to pep up for River Falls game. 

D □ D 

31. Men's Glee Club Dance — Bargain prices attract huge crowd. 

November 



2. Walk up a flight and save money! Depression prices on Tower pictures won't 
last long. 

D □ □ 

4. Free ticket night at the Orpheum. Lynwood Hall has fine attendance record. 

C D D 

6. Seniors ahead with Tower pledges. Get yours now or never! 

□ D □ 

8. Rushing week s; 

Rah! rah! rah! 
Hyp! Phi! Sma! 

D □ □ 
11. Bishop Wilson of Eau Claire gives Armistice Da\ 

□ D D 
13. "S" Club Brawl. 



Page u; 








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I 



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• it-iduv flight oonltrc gna 

•ItreV' w.d.a. float — DUCK 

elron tne m.a.p. cl 



lown 



ly nwooj Co -ecU" — J". rrv d. > 
cheerleader/ - — c iivalry— arem 



Page 149 




/7S^BllWEK/7J2 



N vember — Continued 



16. Betty I ou of Homemakers entertains. 

D D D 

20. S. S. A. dance looks like men's mixer 'til girls appear about nine o'clock. The or- 
chestra stand is gracefully decorated with sawhorscs. 

□ □ D 

23. Basket-ball practice begins — ten letter men eligible to play. 

□ D □ 
2*. Washington elm planted on campus. 

□ □ a 

27. Thanksgiving! Many uses made of vacation. Thankful for everything except the 
no-cut day on Friday. 

D D D 

28. Racial diet exhibit. Mary Carmody voices opinion that she "wouldn't give more 
thin tin ants" for anything but the Irish diet. 

D G □ 

31. Faculty initiate room 28 as a social room. 

December 



1. Berea exhibit and Japanese sale. Do your Christmas shopping now! 

□ □ G 

Mr. I red Carberry conducts assembly singing. Remember, girls, he warned you 
that Hob Gunn is a dangerous man. 

D □ D 

4. S Club "What/it." All star cast! Showing some of our athletes in a new role. 



['age /«i 




December — Continued 



7. Prospective public speakers practice on stage. Students get new angle on class- 
mates. 

D □ □ 
9. Stout wins first cage game from St. Paul Luther. 3 1-7. 

nan 

10. "Apollo Duo'" gives assembly program. "Swede" Keller's reputation as a dialect 
artist challenged. 

G D □ 

11. Philo Christmas dance. Last dance of 1931. 

□ D D 

14. Dutch dates suggested by men prove unpopular with women. 

□ n n 

16. Santa Claus hangs candy cane on Home Economics tree for Dean Price. 

G □ □ 

17. Tower directories out — great satisfaction shown, but where are the phone num- 
bers, Paul? 

D □ □ 

18. Are you leaving on the one o'clock? Whcn'll you get home? 



January 



5. Happy Vu Year! What did you get for Christmas? 

n □ □ 

-. "Georgia" displays new overshoes acquired during the holidays. 

D D G 
S. Mr. Tustison "calls 'em" at New Year's dance. Leap Year tactics not obvious. 

D D G 

12. Checker tournament in full swing at Bye's. 

C G G 

13. long expected inspectors arrive. 

D G G 
15. Students celebrate la Crosse win at victory dance. 












■ 




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January — Continued 



\j. Five men guests of honor at Annex tea. Harold Rasmusscn reports a type of re- 
ception different from that given everyday callers. 

□ D D 

18. Exam week. Xuff sed. 

D □ □ 

19. Faculty go sleigh riding — not worried about exams. 

D D D 

21. President urges us to "go to it." To what? 

Second Lyceum number. Community Players present "The Big Pond." 

□ □ □ 

22. End of semester — sixteen graduates leave. \\"e wish them luck. 

□ □ □ 
25. Registration day. 

G □ □ 

2j. Book display in I. A. corridor. Shorty Beach informs Mr. Janka that he doesn't 
need a book; he read one once. 

d □ a 

30. Sixth annual Tacky Drag. Two orchestras. Marjorie Stackcstad displays valuable 
poultry pearls! Wit and beauty of campus present! 



February 



1. Soph girls win basket-ball championship and the silver cup. The referee plays a 
good game on the Tower's dance floor. 

G □ D 



3. We hope the eggs "Squeaks" Anderson has been walking on, since the trip to Riv- 
er Falls last Friday, don't break. 



G □ G 



5. Lovey Buros yets a present from the Stout fellows. The Stout-Superior score 
looked like a million dollars to him. 



.v^ys-* looked like 




Pat' >54 



February — Continued 



9. Bill Rowe. in locking ever the organization dummy for the Tower, wants to know 
what new club the mongrels are. Nichols kindly interprets the abbreviation for 
Men's Glee Club. 

D □ □ 

13. The favored boys almost have to dance in an undecorated gym. but Lee's ride to 
the rescue; and the Hyps. Phis, and Smas work hard all Saturday. The formal is a 
big success. 

D D □ 

I7. The Hyps, Phis, and Sm.u initiate new members this week. Marian McArthur an- 
nounces that she skipped "Lakcbank I" in favor of more advanced courses. 

D D □ 
19. River Falls works hard to win from Blue Devils. 

□ D D 

24. "Junior" Schwartz has finally located the valentines he received last year that 
didn't have writing on them and is mailing them immediately. 

□ □ □ 

25. Pegasus Club entertains at a Washington tea. 

□ □ □ 

26. Stunts tonight. Did the Lutheran students ever put it over? La Crosse State 
Teachers win from Stout. 

□ □ □ 

27. S. S. A. dance. Free. So all the students went. 



□ d a 

29. Last day of month. Everybody waiting for the checks which are due tomorrow, 
and wondering whether the lion will make his debut the first day of March. 






Pate 15s 




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March 

I. Guess the lion is here. 

3. Philo benefit movie. Free tickets no good. Too bad. 

4. The dancing team out for the big pep dance before the Eau Claire game. The big 
game in the evening is in our favor. Bunny Bruness docs the usual entertaining 
on the flcor. Hyps givt us a good dance. 

11. Mr. Good's group of vocal artists put on a concert. It's too bad that the lucky 
Strike people weren't around to get some testimonials. 

14. Lew Sarctt held the audience of the Lyceum course spellbound with his talk on 
Beauty in Nature. 

17. The Philos have a tea today. Why don't they invite the fellows so that they can 
learn to balance tea cups on their knees? 

18. All of the Soph boys .uui girls enjoy themselves at their own little party. 
Stout is admitted into the North Central Association of Colleges. 

19. Another of the S. S. A. free dances. This one is a new kind. Stag, and ladies' 
choice. Did the men rind out where they rate! 

20. Home Economics Club tea. The cookies were also good. 

24. Tomorrow we begin our Easter holiday. Four days of nothing to do (?) and the 
quarter over. Not so bad? 

29. Here we are. back at the job again. Even Reinhold is complaining about lack of 
sleep. 



April 



1. No April fool about this. The Women's Glee Club dance was a dandy. It fooled 
'em all. 

2. Goober is still wondering why he bit on some of the gags pulled on him. Knott 
is trying to figure out how he can remember some of the jokes for next year. 




I'age ifi 



Ov+e xiiwek /<7 j 2 



April — Continued 



7. The rafters of the auditorium reverberated to the sweet voices of the Women's 

Glee Club tonight. 

8. Even Al Rowe went to the Areme dance. 

16. Whoopee! Another of those popular free dances. All of the Scotchmen go to 
the S. S. A. dance. 

IS. Last of the Lyceum course numbers tonight. Opera for to feast vo soul on. 

23. Brother Jack showed the world today what a real prom king should and could do. 
Jake sure m.ulc a real job of decorating. The girls looked as though the depression 
had been history for a thousand years. 

29. The M. A. P.'s spring play is .1 real success. 



May 

l, M.ugy" Wood seen early this morning carrying a May basket in the direction of 
Second Street. 

4. Enrollment in Lakcbank and Canoeing courses steadily increasing. 

8. Track and baseball have been tirst in the sporting circles. 

11. Even the Lynwoodites passed up free ticket night at the Orpheum to enjoy spring's 

balmy breezes. 

15. Have you seen the new Towers? 

19. W. A. A. gives a spring tea. Delightful hostesses. 

23. Baccalaureate address and Senior breakfast. 

25. S. A. A. Frolic. Students as frisky as lambs in spring. 

28. Commencement. We are near the end. 

29. Goodbye! Good luck! 



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© 



The Student Hand -Shaking Book 



HIS section will be devoted to the attempted humor of the feature editors. 
Here you arc supposed to find inside information and vital facts. If you 
don't find them, apply to the administration. 



You will retain this for illustrative material. If you arc advised to seek 
success in other fields, you may dispose of it, because there is no other school like Stout! 

Hip hip ! (This is a completion test which you must pass before you receive your 

B. S., the degree which Stout offers for four years of hard labor.) If you can bluff, 
you will receive your sheepskin regardless of whether or not you look intelligent. Look 
at some of the men. 

They arc a product of Lynwood Hall, one of the dormitories, which are unneces- 
sary evils built frcm old barns and various other appropriate buildings. If you come 
from out of town you are forced to reside in one of these until they are full. When 
they arc full, you may live in one of the homes respected by the housing inspectors. 
The youngsters and underclassmen rill the dormitories. Bill Murray and Hill Hoescr 
arc not breaking these regulations. They only act that way to maintain their perpetual 
youth. Carl Roll escapes because of his dignity as the president of the Stout Student 
Association and regulator of the Stout Social Calendar. 

This calendar hangs in the hall for the benefit of those students who want to find 
time for a dance or a dance for the time. The social life of the school is upheld by the 
organizations. 

Every student automatically becomes a member of the Stout Student Association. 
This is the student voice in the school. The voice is lifted mightily when the S. S. A. 
ticket law is enforced at games and dances. 

The Stoutonia is the students' weekly. The editor appears to be a financially em- 
barrassed psychologist attempting to force invitations by allowing frequent articles on 
"Dutch dates" to be printed. The rest of the staff makes an effort to he serious, but 
the funny headlines kill their efforts. 

The Tower is the yearbook, a Junior class publication. In a mistaken effort to cre- 
ate novelties, last year's staff reversed the order of the book. This policy forced the 
1932 staff to enter politics and attempt to arrange their book diplomatically. They have 
removed their brown derbies, rolled up their sleeves, and selected as their emblem a 
steadily increasing number of gray hairs and as their motto, "We'll fool some ot \mi 
people sometime, or bust." 









Pane 16s 




?ts^MWEK/<7J2 



The Manual Arts Players is a theater art group. Their productions bring out much 
talent; such as I vie Vines' ability to play the saxophone and the part of the leading 
man; Harold Strozinsky\ beefing ability; Buck Nelson's disqualifications for an ideal 
husband; and Phil Gray's reform of a family rree. 

The Stout musical organizations are numerous. The two outstanding divisions are 
R.)s\ \ Band and the Junior German Band. These units are independent, sitting in on 
regular band rehearsals occasionally in order to obtain the services of a director free. 
The band and orchestra play characteristic music, a piece for every occasion and always 

the same pieces. 

The Metallurgy club is another group of young men who aspire to higher things. 
They vary their aspirations from Stamstad's Tower Editorship to Butenhoff '^ S 
and Pat Cronk's ambitions to make hits with the ladies. 

The Science Club Boasts as members all who are interested in the progress oJ 
enoe. The most zealous members can be seen tracking centipedes and stray cats to 
their lairs. The fine art of creating explosions is a worthy club project which has been 
undertaken by members enrolled in chemistry classes. 

The Stout Arts and Craft Club is a group of young men with hobbies. They nom- 
inate for honors four members of the Tower Staff and the Junior Class Prexy. For 
"barker" they nominate the one and only Jake who "will do anything that isn't work." 

The \\ . A. A. is a group of girls who encourage strenuous exercise among (h< 
men of the school. They do not sponsor intercollegiate matches, but stress individual 
competition at their five o'clock pep dances and annual colonial ball. 

The S. T. S. is a printers' society whose outstanding achievement is the develop- 
ment of nursery school technique. Swenson's anxiety for the well-being of his small 
charge was enough to make any mother trust him. 

The Home Kconomics Club is open to all girls in school. It is continually trying 
to increase its membership. The girls have been very considerate this year, having pro- 
cured several outside speakers to give guidance to those uppcrclassmcn who haven't de- 
cided what to be when they grow up. 

The Industrial Education Forum is merely a Home Economics Club for men. 
However, they allow only uppcrclassmcn to be members. The reason for this: Fresh- 
men arriving with a questioning mind may discover their defects before they become 
properly awed. 

The Pegasus Club used to be called "Inky lingers." but the girls deeded to start 
with a clean sheet and a new name. Horsey idea! Eh. what? 




Page 164 






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The Stout Y. M. G A. sponsors a stunt show each year. In the past they have 
done some startling things. In 1931 they forced an issue of the Stoutonia not only to 
be on time, but ahead of time. This year they overcame the flu epidemic by replacing 
the five stunts which withdrew with a play which appeared to be extemporaneous. The 
author blamed this on the members of the cast. We are withholding our opinions. 

The Y. W. C. A. is noted for its family attitude. It assigns little sisters to girls 
who want them and big sisters to frosh who sometimes don't want them. 

There are three women's societies on the campus. 

The Hyperians won second place in the homecoming parade this year. The girls 
are persistent in asserting that they won on merit only. They combine brains ,\ni\ 
beauty in their membership. They hold excellent rummage and sandwich sales, and 
arc also outstanding in making money on their dances, choosing nights when Eau Claire 
or River Falls will be here. They were well represented at the Colonial Ball this year, 
both Grand March leaders being Hyps. 

The Philomatheans are the tall girls of the campus. That's how they won the 
cage championship. The Gordon House and Quarters and Foeller play ball for them. 
Grace Quarters won the second place for them at the Stunt Show with her red hair 
which startled the judges into awarding the five dollar gold piece. 

The S. M. A.'s looked like a town society until they took their pledges in. After 
their successful balloon dance, they were SO inflated that they decided to give a bridge 
tea to whoever had enough money to buy a ticket. 

The F. O. B. is a men's club whose object is fraternalism. They scored a hit when 
they donated a new score board to the Armory. Inquiries for further information may 
be made at "The Sign of the Black Derby." 

The K. F. S. is another men's organization. Their contribution to the aesthetic 
elements in Stout is curly hair for men. 

The girls arc wondering when these two organizations will sponsor a return match 
to the mid-winter ball. 



ATHLETICS 

We had a football season, rivals, players, a coach, and equipment, but something 
was lacking. The boys should try grapenuts for break f.w. 

The basket-ball season found us looking up and grinning. No. we didn't get the 
championship, but we won from the champs once and had a successful season. 






Track competition is keen in Stout. Some men practice on the Stout field; others 
prefer the lakebank track for their activities in this minor sport. 



Pate it* 







r 77s^amwKK/7j2 



Tower Advertisers 

J^^KT HE 1932 Tower Staff wishes to express its sincere appreciation to the busi- 
■ " J ness men of Menomonie for their generous financial support so essential to 
^^^^/ the successful publication of our yearbook. To our many advertisers we 
wish to extend our gratitude and thanks for their hearty co-operation. This 
page Contains a list of our loval Tower advertisers. 






Lee's Drug Store 
First National Bank 
Hotel Marion 
Bank of Menomonie 

Peterson's Studio 

Badger State Lumber Co. 

Haase's Apparel Shop 

Shaker Studio 

Russel's Pastry Shop 

"Bye" Olson 

Drs. Steves. Halgrcn and Long 

Sam Ingraham. Insurance 

Orphcum and Grand Theatres 

[ngraham & Torrey 

Cafe La Cone 

Xels Anshus, Jeweler 
A. R. Olson 
Booth by Print Shop 
Tobin Clothing Co. 
Carter Ice and Fuel Co. 
Yolp's Grocery 
Menomonie Clinic 
The W'ehrle Shoppe 
Camera Art Studios 
A. J. Joscphson 
Vanity Beauty Parlor 
Wisconsin Milling Co. 
The Green House 
The Candy Shoppe 
Menomonie Grocery Co. 
Golden Rule 

Montgomery Ward & Co. 
Randall Service Station 




Goodrich Furniture Store 
Bailey Insurance Agency 
Graven & Wilcox 
O & X Lumber Co. 
Fuller Auto Co. 
Menomonie Dye House 
Crescent Creamery Co. 
Menomonie Baking Co. 
Boston Drug Store 
Dr. C. T. Kyle, Osteopath 

\ and Co. 
Berg Chevrolet Co. 
The Olympia Confectionery 
Hudson Essex Sales 

Milady's Shoppe 

C. B. Stone. Insurance 

John E. Duesing. Insurance 

Halberg Decorating Service 

Dunn County News 

Richardson & Richardson 

K reiser Beauty Shop 

A. & P. Store 

Dr. Vanek, Dentist 

Keenan Hardware Co. 

Eau Claire Book & Stationery Co. 

The Smoke Shop 

Rudiger's Radio Shop 

John Meyer. Tailor 

The Farmers' Stores 

A. E. Herrem. Tailor 

Menomonie Auto Co. 

Dr. Clark, Dentist 

Schocnoff Plumbing Co. 






Page 166 



r ^?KUirOR/<7J2 



Thank You 

XX closing the 1932 Tower, 
the Staff wishes to make 
grateful acknowledgment 
to those who have made this publi- 
cation possible. To the advisers and 
to other instructors for their help- 
ful counsel; to the students for their 
generous response to all requests; to 
the advertisers tor their live interest 
in the school and its yearbook, the 
builders of this book express their 
sincere thanks. 



rage i*7